Journalism – Prospecting Journal http://prospectingjournal.com/ Sat, 24 Sep 2022 13:41:55 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://prospectingjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-120x120.png Journalism – Prospecting Journal http://prospectingjournal.com/ 32 32 Orodata Science Selects 8 Journalists for ADH Community Journalism Fellowship Cohort II – TechEconomy Nigeria https://prospectingjournal.com/orodata-science-selects-8-journalists-for-adh-community-journalism-fellowship-cohort-ii-techeconomy-nigeria/ Sat, 24 Sep 2022 13:03:43 +0000 https://prospectingjournal.com/orodata-science-selects-8-journalists-for-adh-community-journalism-fellowship-cohort-ii-techeconomy-nigeria/ Orodata Sciences is delighted to announce the winners and the start of the second cohort of the ADH Community Journalism Fellowship program. The objective of the 3-month program is to improve media capacity to advance media coverage of under-reported issues in local communities across Nigeria using technology, focusing on potential solutions with impact sustainability on […]]]>

Orodata Sciences is delighted to announce the winners and the start of the second cohort of the ADH Community Journalism Fellowship program.

The objective of the 3-month program is to improve media capacity to advance media coverage of under-reported issues in local communities across Nigeria using technology, focusing on potential solutions with impact sustainability on the effective delivery of public services, local development and improved quality of life. .

The first fellowship is a mindful and interactive learning and development experience that allows participants to gain new knowledge about data analytics for journalism, geospatial analysis and remote sensing, community project monitoring and more Again.

The fellowship also provides an opportunity for peer-to-peer learning, access to a larger network of professionals, and facilitated mentorship.

“With each cohort, the fellowship builds the capacity of local newsrooms to report effectively using data-backed evidence. By building the skills of these exceptional people who often work in difficult circumstances, we want to help improve their work to strengthen their communities,” said Blaise Aboh, Global Head of Fellowship. “With these new skills, fellows can use new forms of digital storytelling to ensure their stories are amplified, reach new audiences, and stay afloat long enough for decision-makers to pay attention.”

The programme’s first cohort of 8 fellows, 4 men and 4 women, continued to produce excellent work, which has now been scaled up to reach over 2 million people, and has pushed the government to act on the results. .

Each cohort is selected through a rigorous process and from a large pool of candidates. Applicants present their story idea emphasizing how it relates to the program’s thematic area, and decisions are made based on which presentations meet the program’s selection criteria. Candidates interested in participating in the 3rd cohort should prepare for another call in two months.

The ADH Community Journalism Fellowship (ACJF) is an initiative of Orodata Sciences as it continues to deliver on its promise to enable equitable access to information and knowledge towards solutions that impact the lives of millions.

The program is supported by Africa Data Hub, a reliable and up-to-date source of data on the African continent that promotes quality access to information and data-driven journalism to facilitate evidence-based decision-making.

Meet the ADH Community Journalism Fellows!

Fasilat Oluwuyi

Fasilat Oluwuyi is a Nigeria-based freelance journalist with over five years of experience in print and online media. His rich experience spans editing, writing and content creation.

She is an experienced journalist with a demonstrated track record of working in the media production industry. Skills in magazine, publishing, journalism, media relations and digital media. Media and Communications Professional with a National Diploma, National Higher Diploma focused on Mass Communications from Mashood Abiola Polytechnic Abeokuta.

Blessing Oladunjoye

Oladunjoye Blessing – ADH Community Journalism Fellowship Cohort II

Blessing Oladunjoye is an award-winning journalist and editor of BONews Service, a development news platform that leverages technology to promote issues of women, people with disabilities and children.

Blessing is based in Lagos; Nigeria and her work revolves around gender and social inclusion. In March 2022, she received an Impact Award from the European Union in Nigeria, in recognition of her outstanding contributions to advancing the rights and access to justice for women with disabilities, through inclusive journalism. She is one of the 2022 Solutions Journalism African Fellows of the Solutions Journalism Network, where she reports on initiatives that address social issues.

Daniel Adji

Daniel Adaji – ADH II Community Journalism Fellowship

Daniel Adaji is a journalist, researcher and data analyst at The Insight. He holds a master’s degree in agricultural economics from Makurdi University of Agriculture and has completed several trainings and workshops related to new media. He is a member of several professional bodies, including the Nigerian Factcheckers’ Coalition. As a journalist, he has produced and published several human-angled stories touching on health, gender, climate change, agriculture and finance.

Daniel has authored and contributed to research articles in local and international academic journals.

Daniel works in The Insight’s Office of Investigation and FactCheck and has brought several innovations that have helped move the News platform beyond traditional media.

Nkechi Macaulay

Nkechi Macaulay

Nkechi Macaulay is a seasoned multimedia journalist with over 13 years of experience at the Federal Radio Corporation of Nigeria, an advocate for adolescent reproductive health rights trained by Marie Stopes international with a particular focus on male reproductive health rights and boys.

She is also the founder of the Boyslivesmatter Foundation, an organization designed to raise awareness of Boychild sexual abuse and to educate boys on comprehensive sex education.

She is also a workplace trainer on sexual harassment in the media and churches. She helps create policies on sexual harassment, allowing a platform for staff to air their grievances and providing access to seek advice from a behavioral therapist.

Ugonna Agu

Ugonaa Agu

Ugonna is a graduate in Mass Communication from Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka. She has worked with Radio Nigeria as a journalist for 10 years now and has been reporting, reporting on the paramilitaries, and has an interest in investigative journalism as it relates to the gender base.

She has completed various online and real-time trainings with different media organizations including the Reuters Institute and the Light Center for Journalism in America.

patrick obia

Patrick Obia - ADH II Community Journalism Fellowship

Patrick Obia is an investigative journalist, photojournalist, director of photography, video editor and also assistant editor at Cross River Watch. He was a member of the Civil Media Lab and earned a bachelor’s degree in mass communication from Cross River State University.

NTIEDO EKOTT

Ntiedo Ekott - ADH II Community Journalism Fellowship Cohort

Ntiedo holds a postgraduate degree in Economics and a Bachelor of Science in Statistics from Uyo University and the University of Port Harcourt respectively.

He is a researcher with more than five years of experience in data journalism, research and project management, and a journalist at the Center for Journalism Innovation and Development (CJID), formerly Premium Times Center for Investigative Journalism. He works in the organization’s agricultural development office. He hosts CJID’s weekly newsletter titled “Agric Digits”, which provides a brief summary of important figures in the Nigerian agricultural sector.

Elijah Akoji

Elijah AkojiI - ADH II Community Journalism Fellowship

Elijah is a graduate in mass communication from Bayero University in Kano, with over 4 years of experience in investigative reporting on open contract reporting (OCR) with the International Center for Investigative Reporting (ICIR) , climate reporting, as well as the Grassroots News Project in the North West and part of the North East.

Elijah has been a freelance investigative reporter for a few media outlets in Nigeria and focuses on reporting on budget review, procurement fraud, climate change issues and raising awareness of rural and local orientation.

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Pink Slime Ruins Journalism…and the Color Pink https://prospectingjournal.com/pink-slime-ruins-journalismand-the-color-pink/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 22:41:38 +0000 https://prospectingjournal.com/pink-slime-ruins-journalismand-the-color-pink/ The uniform trousers of the paramedics in the sitcom Doc Martin, in Port Isaac, Cornwell, UK, are Kelly green. Right now cherry wood is out and white kitchens are all the rage. Blue flashing lights are installed on the roof of police cars in Chicago, and pink is sometimes painted on prison walls for its […]]]>

The uniform trousers of the paramedics in the sitcom Doc Martin, in Port Isaac, Cornwell, UK, are Kelly green. Right now cherry wood is out and white kitchens are all the rage. Blue flashing lights are installed on the roof of police cars in Chicago, and pink is sometimes painted on prison walls for its calming effects.

Yellow journalism, or sensationalism, was named after an 1890s cartoon, “Hogan’s Alley,” which featured a “Yellow Kid.” Today, Pink Slime Journalism, or shoddy journalism pushing a political agenda, gets its name from the product that is used as a filler in processed meats. Pink slime fills the cracks when community journalism is absent.

Although I understand the name, I happen to like the color pink – bubblegum and sweetness – a soft color with a bit of boyish flippancy. Too bad to see it used in such an unpleasant style.

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ALEX BRUMMER: Investigative journalism is a public good https://prospectingjournal.com/alex-brummer-investigative-journalism-is-a-public-good/ Sun, 18 Sep 2022 20:50:48 +0000 https://prospectingjournal.com/alex-brummer-investigative-journalism-is-a-public-good/ ALEX BRUMMER: Investigative journalism is a public good – it’s often an uphill battle when big corporations are involved, but don’t give up The role journalism plays in cleaning up business is at the heart of Wirecard’s expose The film tells the story of how Wirecard fraudsters were brought down He also demonstrated how investors, […]]]>

ALEX BRUMMER: Investigative journalism is a public good – it’s often an uphill battle when big corporations are involved, but don’t give up

  • The role journalism plays in cleaning up business is at the heart of Wirecard’s expose
  • The film tells the story of how Wirecard fraudsters were brought down
  • He also demonstrated how investors, auditors and markets can be deceived

There have been few more influential newspaper owners than Lord Northcliffe, founder of the Daily Mail and Daily Mirror and owner of The Times and The Observer.

His life story, told in Andrew Roberts’ biography, The Chief, portrays a meticulous reporter with a passion for campaign journalism.

Roberts doesn’t spare the warts, but what stood out was the leader’s commitment to precision, thorough reporting and never giving up. Newspapers are often outdated for what they do.

A public good: Hard-working journalism caused fraudsters at fintech pioneer Wirecard to crash and embarrass German authorities

The latest economist spoofs British headlines for ‘Pravda’ journalism in coverage of the death of Queen Elizabeth II. A fuller read reveals acres of material ranging from royal complicity in colonialism to criticism of that royal miscreant, the Duke of York.

Investigative and campaign journalism is a public good. The work of this article on the repugnant lawsuits against postmasters and postmistresses by senior Post Office officials has helped reverse a grave injustice. Likewise, campaigns on big paydays, private equity and foreign takeovers have drawn attention to the unedifying failures of modern capitalism.

The powerful role that financial journalism can and does play in cleaning up deals is at the heart of the documentary Skandal! Knock Down Wirecard, published by Netflix.

The film chronicles how the FT’s diligent journalism, backed by a determined editor Lionel Barber, led fraudsters at fintech pioneer Wirecard to crumble and embarrass German authorities. It also demonstrated how easily serious investors, auditors and markets can be fooled if they don’t want to believe something.

Wirecard was Germany’s gateway to becoming a leading player in a high-tech world dominated by Silicon Valley. It was a brilliant undertaking that demonstrated that Teutonic capitalism was much more than just designing what were – before Tesla – the best motor cars in the world. Searching for Wirecard’s flaws, FT reporters, rounded up by senior detective Dan McCrum, traveled to the Philippines and beyond. They established that revenue from the Pacific was a pipe dream.

At each stage of their investigation, the FT team encountered formidable obstacles and intimidation. In 1990, while The Guardian (where I worked) was investigating the corrupt bank BCCI, a colleague of mine was hit by an oncoming car.

During the Wirecard investigation, the phones of FT journalists were tapped. Additionally, well-known law firms have sought to silence the FT for trying to bring down a huge company. In Germany, politicians frown on hedge funds and short sellers – who profit from falling corporate stock prices. As this paper has seen in the financial crisis, the latter are often the smartest investors.

In Wirecard’s investigation, it was intrepid short sellers from New York to France who provided the leads and route to the documents that brought down the lender. Skandal is not a skillfully made docudrama in the tradition of The Big Short.

And the all-too-familiar relationship between FT journalists and some unsavory figures in the south of France – who made millions after receiving information the paper was soon to publish – might raise eyebrows. In this case, however, the end may well justify the means.

There are big takeaways for financial sleuths. The stronger the complaints from PRs and lawyers, the closer you are likely to be to the truth.

It’s often an uphill battle when big companies are involved. But don’t be intimidated and don’t give up.

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The talent shortage threatening journalism https://prospectingjournal.com/the-talent-shortage-threatening-journalism/ Sat, 17 Sep 2022 11:52:35 +0000 https://prospectingjournal.com/the-talent-shortage-threatening-journalism/ “Journalists can be so good at reporting others, but they are rarely good at reporting themselves.” So wrote my friend Kevin d’Arcy, a prominent British journalist, in an article entitled “Living in Interesting Times”, recently published on the website of the British section of the Association of European Journalists. D’Arcy, who has worked for major […]]]>

“Journalists can be so good at reporting others, but they are rarely good at reporting themselves.”

So wrote my friend Kevin d’Arcy, a prominent British journalist, in an article entitled “Living in Interesting Times”, recently published on the website of the British section of the Association of European Journalists.

D’Arcy, who has worked for major publications in the UK and Canada including The Economist and the Financial Times, says: “The biggest change is that the job of journalism is no longer just for journalists. To some extent this has always been true, but largely due to social media, the scale is touching the sky.

“It is important for the simple reason that the public does not benefit from the traditional protection of legal and social rules. There is no one in charge. … The common domain is sinking rapidly.

So true. But his argument begs the question: is journalism itself doing its job these days?

I generally avoid any discussion of journalism – its current state, its imagined biases and its future. Dan Raviv, a former CBS News radio and television correspondent, told me in a TV interview, “My job is simple: I try to find out what’s going on, then I tell people.

I have never heard a better explanation of the job of journalist.

Of course, the journalist knows other things: the tricks of the trade, like judging the news; how to get the reader to read, the viewer to watch and the listener to listen and hopefully hold their attention.

Professionals know how to guess what readers, viewers, and listeners might want to know about a particular issue. They know how to avoid defamation and steer clear of questionable and manipulative sources. But the skills of journalism are fading, along with the newspapers and broadcasters that fostered and cherished them.

Publications die or survive on the uncertain drip of a life support system. Newspapers that once boasted global coverage are now just pamphlets. The Baltimore Sun, for example, at the time a major newspaper, once had 12 foreign bureaus. No more.

Three newspapers dominate: the Wall Street Journal, the Washington Post and the New York Times. They took the lead and owed their position to the success of early promotion of their brands on the internet. Now they have advertising revenue and even more revenue thanks to the introduction of paywalls.

Local news coverage may return as before, but this time through local digital sites. I prefer traditional newspapers, but the future of local news seems to be online.

A major and critical threat to journalism comes from within: it is a shortage of talent. In for money; publishers don’t pay for talent, and that’s corrosive. Salaries for newspapers and regional television and radio have always been extremely low, and now they are the worst they have been in 50 years. This discourages the necessary talents.

For over 30 years, I owned a newsletter publishing company in Washington, and I hired summer interns — and paid them. Some of the early recruits achieved success in journalism, and others remarkable success.

Later, I had the same brilliant journalism students — young men and women so capable you could send them to an audience on Capitol Hill or trust them with a complex story with confidence.

The most gifted, alas, did not go to the newsrooms but to law school. They told me that while they were interested in reporting, they weren’t interested in low-wage lives.

Most journalists across America earn less than $40,000. Even at the mighty Washington Post, a syndicated newspaper, battered reporters earn just $62,000 a year.

To tell the story of a turbulent world, you need people who are gifted, creative, cultured and committed to the job. The bold and the brilliant will not engage in a life of scarcity.

To my friend Kevin, I have to say that if we can’t offer a viable alternative to the cacophony of social media, if we have a second-rate workforce, if the information product is inadequate and untouched by competent human writers, then the slide will be Continue. Desktop publishing is not publishing. I enjoy editing, and I know how much better my job is for it.

The journalism that Kevin and I have reveled in over these many decades will perish without new talent. The talent will come out and, I hope, will provide the answers that our profession needs.

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The talent shortage threatening journalism – InsideSources https://prospectingjournal.com/the-talent-shortage-threatening-journalism-insidesources/ Thu, 15 Sep 2022 20:34:22 +0000 https://prospectingjournal.com/the-talent-shortage-threatening-journalism-insidesources/ “Journalists can be so good at reporting others, but they are rarely good at reporting themselves.” So wrote my friend Kevin d’Arcy, a prominent British journalist, in an article entitled “Living in Interesting Times”, recently published on the website of the British section of the Association of European Journalists. D’Arcy, who has worked for major […]]]>

“Journalists can be so good at reporting others, but they are rarely good at reporting themselves.”

So wrote my friend Kevin d’Arcy, a prominent British journalist, in an article entitled “Living in Interesting Times”, recently published on the website of the British section of the Association of European Journalists.

D’Arcy, who has worked for major publications in the UK and Canada including The Economist and the Financial Times, says: “The biggest change is that the job of journalism is no longer just for journalists. To some extent this has always been true, but largely due to social media, the scale is touching the sky.

“It is important for the simple reason that the public does not benefit from the traditional protection of legal and social rules. There is no one in charge. … The common domain is sinking rapidly.

So true. But his argument begs the question: is journalism itself doing its job these days?

I generally avoid any discussion of journalism – its current state, its imagined biases and its future. Dan Raviv, a former CBS News radio and television correspondent, told me in a TV interview, “My job is simple: I try to find out what’s going on, then I tell people.

I have never heard a better explanation of the job of journalist.

Of course, the journalist knows other things: the tricks of the trade, like judging the news; how to get the reader to read, the viewer to watch and the listener to listen and hopefully hold their attention.

Professionals know how to guess what readers, viewers, and listeners might want to know about a particular issue. They know how to avoid defamation and steer clear of questionable and manipulative sources. But the skills of journalism are fading, along with the newspapers and broadcasters that fostered and cherished them.

Publications die or survive on the uncertain drip of a life support system. Newspapers that once boasted global coverage are now just pamphlets. The Baltimore Sun, for example, at the time a major newspaper, once had 12 foreign bureaus. No more.

Three newspapers dominate: the Wall Street Journal, the Washington Post and the New York Times. They took the lead and owed their position to the success of early promotion of their brands on the internet. Now they have advertising revenue and even more revenue thanks to the introduction of paywalls.

Local news coverage may return as before, but this time through local digital sites. I prefer traditional newspapers, but the future of local news seems to be online.

A major and critical threat to journalism comes from within: it is a shortage of talent. In for money; publishers don’t pay for talent, and that’s corrosive. Salaries for newspapers and regional television and radio have always been extremely low, and now they are the worst they have been in 50 years. This discourages the necessary talents.

For over 30 years, I owned a newsletter publishing company in Washington, and I hired summer interns — and paid them. Some of the early recruits achieved success in journalism, and others remarkable success.

Later, I had the same brilliant journalism students — young men and women so capable you could send them to an audience on Capitol Hill or trust them with a complex story with confidence.

The most gifted, alas, did not go to the newsrooms but to law school. They told me that while they were interested in reporting, they weren’t interested in low-wage lives.

Most journalists across America earn less than $40,000. Even at the mighty Washington Post, a syndicated newspaper, battered reporters earn just $62,000 a year.

To tell the story of a turbulent world, you need people who are gifted, creative, cultured and committed to the job. The bold and the brilliant will not engage in a life of scarcity.

To my friend Kevin, I have to say that if we can’t offer a viable alternative to the cacophony of social media, if we have a second-rate workforce, if the information product is inadequate and untouched by competent human writers, then the slide will be Continue. Desktop publishing is not publishing. I enjoy editing, and I know how much better my job is for it.

The journalism that Kevin and I have reveled in over these many decades will perish without new talent. The talent will come out and, I hope, will provide the answers that our profession needs.

]]>
Mozambican writer Mia Couto: “Journalism must regain its role in building a better world” https://prospectingjournal.com/mozambican-writer-mia-couto-journalism-must-regain-its-role-in-building-a-better-world/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 20:01:59 +0000 https://prospectingjournal.com/mozambican-writer-mia-couto-journalism-must-regain-its-role-in-building-a-better-world/ On July 5, 1955, in the coastal town of Beira, Mozambique, Mia Couto was born. It is the pseudonym of António Emílio Leite Couto, one of the most renowned African writers on the continent and abroad. In 2013 he was reward the Camões prize, the most important literary distinction in Portuguese-speaking countries, and he is […]]]>

On July 5, 1955, in the coastal town of Beira, Mozambique, Mia Couto was born. It is the pseudonym of António Emílio Leite Couto, one of the most renowned African writers on the continent and abroad. In 2013 he was reward the Camões prize, the most important literary distinction in Portuguese-speaking countries, and he is the only African writer to be elected member of the Brazilian Literature Academy. Recently, he received an honorary doctorate from the Júlio de State University of Mesquita in São Paulo.

A journalist and writer, Couto has published over 15 books, mostly novels in which he explores African cultural identity. I contacted Couto to find out more about his views on journalism and literature.

Here are some takeaways from our conversation:

You started working as a journalist in 1974, when Mozambique was about to become an independent country. What was it like to be a journalist back then?

Everything was different. The country, the media, the journalists, the national and international context. I became a journalist because I wanted to, but also out of a duty of activism. I was taught to work for a newspaper. It was not something new for me. My father was a journalist himself and my older brother was already working for [the newspaper] Notícias when I started working for [the newspaper] Tribune in 1974.

Tribuna was an afternoon paper that politically opposed colonial rule. He was crossed out by the great poet Rui Knopfli. José Craveirinha and Luís Bernardo Honwana worked there. When I joined the team, other young Mozambicans joined them, like Luís Patraquim, Julius Kazembe, Ricardo Santos, Benjamim Faduco. We felt on a mission and the political commitment was unanimous.

The press room was definitely where we wanted to be all day, no matter how hard we worked or the salary. There was a national goal to fight for. There was a socialist revolution that fascinated us. It was another era. I could not repeat this kind of feat again.

What made you leave journalism to become a writer?

I no longer believed in the truth behind the cause that got me out of college. But I have no regrets. On the contrary, I owe a great deal to these revolutionary times. I didn’t make any personal profit, but I grew as a person and I know I am who I am now because of how I connected with others.

Journalism was like a school for me. I learned to read this great country and its great diversity and complexity. Journalism was like a school for my literary work – I knew I was writing for someone else, and reader awareness was almost instantaneous. On a deeper level, I was interviewing people and reporting so that I could reveal people’s existence and their stories. I didn’t know it at the time, but I was already in literature.

It’s been more than 30 years now since you stopped being a journalist. Do you feel that journalism has changed since then?

There have been profound changes in journalism globally. When it comes to journalism in Mozambique, it was nice to see the rise of independent media. Some would question the term “independent” because there is supposedly someone behind it. Even if this is true, it is good to have different forces able to express different points of view.

I think what I consider to be the heart of journalism has really shrunk: news and investigative journalism. Most radio, television and newspaper newscasts are devoted to talk shows and opinion makers. Readers and viewers should have the right, above all, to have access to information provided by the work of good professionals. They don’t need other people ruminating opinions on their behalf on facts that most of the time are not properly reported as they should be.

In recent years, journalism around the world has been challenged by influencers who see themselves as news publishers and by disinformation. What do you think about this?

I think the debate, and the ideas in general, have become impoverished. Thoughts have become a cheap commodity. They are no longer critical or productive. The general feeling of intolerance and political polarization has replaced public debate with insults, and the search for truth with slander and fear.

There is no easy way out of this because fake news makes big money ideologically, financially and politically. Populist politicians and far-right dictators take advantage of this permanent environment of war and crisis. No one cares about the true causes of a social phenomenon. They just want to know whose fault it is.

Press freedom in Mozambique is just as new as democracy in the country. Is this freedom effective?

It is formally effective. However, it is in this state of freedom that journalists like Carlos Cardoso were killed. Others have been threatened and abused. These threats do not always come from political forces, but from those in power who know they will not be punished. There will be no freedom of information as long as there is freedom and impunity for those who attack journalists. Often threats are not made against people. But the industry dictates rules that are far from democratic.

For example, in most newspapers, magazines, and television and radio shows, coverage of arts and culture has been reduced, as has coverage of civil rights.

Journalist Carlos Cardoso was killed in 2000. He is considered a symbol of investigative journalism in Mozambique. What do you think of investigative journalism today and the violence directed against journalists?

I believe that kind of journalism has not survived in most countries. I think fear has won. After years of threats outweighing any attempt at investigative reporting, it is hard for journalism to win. It has been a long time since I read a good investigative article published in Mozambique. We still have big outlets like the BBC and AlJazeera. However, even in these cases you can see that there is not much room for journalists.

What advice would you give to young journalists?

Respect the truth and stand up for the truth no matter what. Don’t let yourself be bought. Journalism must regain its role in building a better world.


picture by Fernando Leite Couto Foundation.

This article was originally published on our Portuguese site. It was translated by Priscilla Brito.

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There is a need for local journalism | Opinion https://prospectingjournal.com/there-is-a-need-for-local-journalism-opinion/ Sun, 11 Sep 2022 11:00:00 +0000 https://prospectingjournal.com/there-is-a-need-for-local-journalism-opinion/ Last week we first announced some major changes coming Antelope Valley Press effective October 1. In our current environment, we find it necessary to return to a five-day-a-week production schedule and eliminate the use of carriers to deliver our newspaper. This announcement came as a shock to some and did not please others. One of […]]]>

Last week we first announced some major changes coming Antelope Valley Press effective October 1.

In our current environment, we find it necessary to return to a five-day-a-week production schedule and eliminate the use of carriers to deliver our newspaper.

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Go For Broke, AAJA-LA Celebrate Inaugural Journalism Institute for Students https://prospectingjournal.com/go-for-broke-aaja-la-celebrate-inaugural-journalism-institute-for-students/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 05:14:30 +0000 https://prospectingjournal.com/go-for-broke-aaja-la-celebrate-inaugural-journalism-institute-for-students/ High school students participating in the first Go For Broke Journalism Institute (from left to right): Esmeralda Medina, Angel Reyes, Annabel Chung, Sidney Berjamin, Dominika Tenorio, Marissa Guadarrama and Aniq Akter. By MIKEY HIRANO CULROSS, Rafu Editor Last Friday marked 77 years since Japan’s signing of surrender documents officially ended World War II. As the […]]]>
High school students participating in the first Go For Broke Journalism Institute (from left to right): Esmeralda Medina, Angel Reyes, Annabel Chung, Sidney Berjamin, Dominika Tenorio, Marissa Guadarrama and Aniq Akter.

By MIKEY HIRANO CULROSS, Rafu Editor

Last Friday marked 77 years since Japan’s signing of surrender documents officially ended World War II. As the years and decades continue their invertible creep, the voices of those who fought and lived through this global cataclysm fade into the silence of history.

The most recent figures from the US Department of Veterans Affairs estimate that 234 World War II veterans die every day. Of the 16 million people involved in the war, only 240,329 were still alive last September; figures are updated annually on September 30.

With the loss of every veteran, first-hand accounts of the conflict that reshaped the world fade away, many disappear – unheard – forever.

As President and CEO of Go For Broke National Education Center, Mitch Maki has made it his solemn mission to ensure that the voices and memories of Japanese Americans who served are not lost.

ABC7 news anchor David Ono chats with Marissa Guadarrama after the presentations. Ono was part of the mentorship group that included news professionals, journalism professors and experts in Asian American studies.

“We’re telling the story of World War II veterans, and one of the challenges we have is how to take an 80-year-old story and make it relevant for young people,” Maki said Aug. 27. , during a gathering of high school students, teachers and journalism professionals at the Japanese American National Museum.

“We are also working to find ways to make this story relevant to young people outside of the JA community. These are really important issues for us,” he added.

The event at JANM was held to celebrate the culmination of the first student projects at the Go For Broke Journalism Institute, created in partnership with the LA Chapter of the Asian American Journalists Association.

“We had the idea of ​​creating an institute where we give concrete skills to young people, but also we give them history, and their first project must be a kind of report on the experience of JA veterans who are relates to contemporary issues,” explained Maki. “It’s not just a book report, it’s much more involved.”

Teresa Watanabe, vice president of special projects for the LA chapter of the Asian American Journalists Association, led the organization of working professionals and scholars to mentor high school students in the Go For Broke program.

To map out ideas and write a roadmap for the project, Maki turned to The bone Angeles Times writer Teresa Watanabe, who also sits on the board of AAJA-LA.

“Before I could even express the whole idea, she said, ‘Let’s do this,’ and we created this institute over the summer,” he recalled. “Teresa had contact with Downtown Magnet High School, and the eight students we recruited are all from that school and all happen to be young women.”

Maki noted that none of the students are of Japanese descent – ​​their families hail from countries including Mexico, Korea, Guatemala, the Philippines and Bangladesh.

“They’re all immigrants or children of immigrants, and that’s what’s been so gratifying, how much they’ve connected to the story,” Maki said.

Students were tasked with creating presentations that capture their own understanding of the JA experience through their personal goals as high school students in Los Angeles, as well as their cultural backgrounds. The program connected them with a host of media mentors, including The LA Times, The New York Times and ABC7 News, in addition to the Faculty of Journalism and Asian American Studies at UCLA and Cal State LA

Mitch Maki, president and CEO of the Go For Broke National Education Center, praised the students for finding common threads connecting their lives to the experiences of Japanese American World War II veterans.

Due to COVID, interviews and conversations for this first iteration of the journalism institute were conducted online. Maki hopes to arrange face-to-face meetings with veterans and mentors in future projects.

It turns out that each of the students in the program has some experience in journalism, through their involvement with their school newspaper.

Charlotte Zomer is an English teacher at Downtown Magnet HS and is a journalism consultant for the school newspaper, The Helios. She said she was thrilled when she was first approached about offering this opportunity to her students.

“It’s been a wonderful experience for them to get resources beyond what I’m able to provide in a journalism course, get real-world applications, and learn from professionals in the field,” Zomer said. . “These stories are ones that we can all relate to, that they’re all really connected to on a very deep level. Maybe we don’t tell these stories enough in the program, and I’m sure they would have liked to know more about this important part of our collective history.

For her project, 17-year-old Angel Reyes was drawn to the story of one particular person, who touched her as the daughter of immigrants and the daughter of a nurse.

“I wanted to focus on women’s issues, especially in today’s world,” Reyes explained. “I discovered the Women’s Army Corps, and I eventually wanted to focus on student nurses within the WAC.

“During my research, I found the story of Aiko Tanamachi Endo, a nurse during World War II. I wrote about how her mother inspired her, how hard she worked in the farm family before she was stripped of her home, how her father encouraged her and her sister to do many different things and develop what they loved. Aiko’s sister joined the nursing corps, and my sister is currently in nursing school; I thought there were a lot of parallels between her life and mine, and I wanted to write about it.

Despite another event to attend earlier in the day, ABC7 news anchor David Ono managed to arrive at JANM early enough to meet the students and share his thoughts.

“What I love about seeing the young faces in this room is the promise of talented, capable journalists guiding us in telling America’s stories,” Ono said. “I feel encouraged for the future of our nation by you.”

Maki said he was delighted with how each of the projects tapped into a common thread, a common thread that was perfectly in line with the Go For Broke spirit: the will to fight for a better future and to work for a more perfect union.

While assembling her project on veteran and U.S. Senator Daniel Inouye, Dominika Tenorio shared how she gained a new respect for the importance of preserving stories.

“This program has opened my eyes to the great responsibility that journalists have for our community,” she said.

Annabel Chung agreed with the sentiment, adding, “I wanted to write a story that helps make sure these topics don’t go away because our regular school curriculum doesn’t include them.”

Through her research, Reyes said the personal kinship she feels with people living, working and sacrificing eight decades ago gives her a lot of relevance in 2022.

“We tend to view history as a grandiose subject, so much so that we become desensitized to everything that is going on around us,” she said. “I think in order to understand and become more caring for others, you need to know more about specific people who have experienced significant events in history. I think we can all understand each other better if it’s on a level very personal.

Photos by MIKEY HIRANO CULROSS/Rafu Shimpo

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SPLC calls for full reinstatement of CA journalism professor https://prospectingjournal.com/splc-calls-for-full-reinstatement-of-ca-journalism-professor/ Tue, 06 Sep 2022 23:24:26 +0000 https://prospectingjournal.com/splc-calls-for-full-reinstatement-of-ca-journalism-professor/ The Student Press Law Center is calling for the full reinstatement of journalism educator Adriana Chavira with compensation. Any disciplinary notice must be removed from his file. Ms. Chavira was informed on September 1 that she was suspended for three days without pay and that a disciplinary notice was placed on her personal file for […]]]>

The Student Press Law Center is calling for the full reinstatement of journalism educator Adriana Chavira with compensation. Any disciplinary notice must be removed from his file.

Ms. Chavira was informed on September 1 that she was suspended for three days without pay and that a disciplinary notice was placed on her personal file for her refusal to withdraw information from an article published in the pearl pole, the independent newspaper at Daniel Pearl Magnet High School (DPMHS) in Lake Balboa, Calif., where Ms. Chavira is the longtime counselor. The story reported on the impact of the COVID-19 vaccine mandate on school staff and noted that after the vaccine mandate was put in place, the school librarian failed to show up to school. The former librarian demanded that any reference to her be removed from the story.

California lawmakers anticipated exactly what is happening at DPMHS today and passed legislation to prevent it. In 1977, California led the nation in passing the first state law specifically protecting the editorial freedom of high school student journalists in the state. The law was later amended to include specific protection for student media advisors who were frequent targets of administrators who could no longer directly censor their students. The California law has been the model adopted by 15 other states to date and currently under consideration by several others.

SPLC Executive Director Hadar Harris said: “The action taken against Adriana Chavira is wrong on every level. Censorship is bad. Retaliation against teachers is unacceptable. And in California, there’s a specific law that says it’s illegal. It’s mind-boggling that a nationally recognized educator at a journalism school named for a murdered journalist is being suspended for her students’ solid reporting, in direct violation of California’s freedom of speech law. student expression that specifically protects against situations like this. We all need to stand up and demand justice.

Harris continued, “The retaliatory actions of school administrators against teachers are designed to pressure educators and journalism advisers to censor their students. Administrators at Daniel Pearl Magnet School must uphold the law and support student journalism – and excellent journalism educators like Adriana Chavira. We ask them to do the right thing and reinstate Ms. Chavira immediately.


Daniel Pearl Magnet High School was named for Daniel Pearl, who was a reporter for The Wall Street Journal. In 2002, he was kidnapped while working and then killed by terrorists in Pakistan, just months after 9/11. After her murder, Pearl’s family and friends created the Daniel Pearl Foundation to “continue his legacy, using music and words to address the root causes of the hatred that cost him his life”.

The Student Press Law Center (splc.org, @splc) is an independent, nonpartisan 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that works at the intersection of law, journalism, and education to support, promote, and defend the rights of student journalists and their advisors at high school and college levels. Based in Washington, DC, the Student Press Law Center provides free information, training, and legal assistance to student journalists and the educators who work with them.

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Editor slams ‘local news suppression’ as he backs Portsmouth News https://prospectingjournal.com/editor-slams-local-news-suppression-as-he-backs-portsmouth-news/ Mon, 05 Sep 2022 08:07:54 +0000 https://prospectingjournal.com/editor-slams-local-news-suppression-as-he-backs-portsmouth-news/ An editor has denounced the “suppression of local news” after copies of a nearby newspaper were blocked from reaching his patch. Mark Waldron, editor of The News, Portsmouth, has demanded answers from both Essex Police and Thurrock Council over the incident, in which police prevented delivery drivers from leaving the factory where the National World […]]]>

An editor has denounced the “suppression of local news” after copies of a nearby newspaper were blocked from reaching his patch.

Mark Waldron, editor of The News, Portsmouth, has demanded answers from both Essex Police and Thurrock Council over the incident, in which police prevented delivery drivers from leaving the factory where the National World title is printed.

Now Newsquest Hampshire regional editor Kimberley Barber has publicly expressed her solidarity with the Portsmouth daily following the incident, which came amid a protest by environmental activists near the factory.

Kimberley, who was a business editor at The News before taking her current role at Newsquest, criticized the police decision as having “undermined the principle of journalism”. in an editorial for the Hampshire Chronicle titled “Why we must not accept the suppression of local news”.

Kimberley, pictured, wrote: ‘The paper published a free online version, and on Tuesday, Monday’s papers had also arrived in stores. God bless the poor truck driver.

“But in the end, it’s a worrying situation when freedom of the press is threatened. Questions must be answered – and assurances must be given that this will not happen again – in the News or any other local newspaper.

Speaking to HTFP, she added: “The delivery issues that have affected The News could happen to any local news title and it is essential that plans are in place to ensure this does not happen. reproduce more.

“I keep a close eye on my former workplace and have great respect for Editor Mark Waldron and his hard-working team. I know how devastated they must have been to see their hard work prevented from reach the stores.

“It’s such a difficult time for local news right now as we fight to stay in business despite rising production costs, the cost of living crisis affecting our readers’ ability to buy our newspapers and growing public mistrust.

“It is essential that reliable and reliable local information continues to reach our communities. This must not happen again. »

Essex Police previously told The News the decision had been made to ‘keep everyone safe, keep traffic flowing and minimize the impact of the disruption to businesses and critical infrastructure’.

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