Journalism – Prospecting Journal http://prospectingjournal.com/ Wed, 18 May 2022 17:38:43 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://prospectingjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-120x120.png Journalism – Prospecting Journal http://prospectingjournal.com/ 32 32 Helensburgh columnist Adveritser wins Scottish Veterans Award https://prospectingjournal.com/helensburgh-columnist-adveritser-wins-scottish-veterans-award/ Tue, 17 May 2022 20:38:32 +0000 https://prospectingjournal.com/helensburgh-columnist-adveritser-wins-scottish-veterans-award/ A weekly columnist won a major military honor for his volunteer work. Mike Edwards, who writes for the Helensburgh Advertiser, was named Reservist of the Year at the Scottish Veterans Awards. The former sports correspondent for the Aberdeen-based daily The Press & Journal, pictured, received the award in recognition of his work for various good […]]]>

A weekly columnist won a major military honor for his volunteer work.

Mike Edwards, who writes for the Helensburgh Advertiser, was named Reservist of the Year at the Scottish Veterans Awards.

The former sports correspondent for the Aberdeen-based daily The Press & Journal, pictured, received the award in recognition of his work for various good causes related to the armed forces

In particular, he was honored for his work with Erskine, the charity for former servicemen, who nominated him for this honor.

Mike, who has written a bi-monthly column for the advertiser since last year, told the newspaper: “Yeah, I got the award; yes, my name is on the trophy; and yes, I received all the congratulations.

“But the award is as much for the military charities that I am proud and privileged to serve as it is for me.

“I have to thank Erskine from the bottom of my heart for nominating me and I sincerely believe the award is for the charity as well.

“I am fortunate to be involved with this remarkable organization whose exceptional staff do so many wonderful things for our incredible veterans.

“It’s a privilege to be able to do all of this while serving as an Army Reservist, a role I was blessed with for almost 30 years. I’m really humble.

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Congress must act to preserve the future of local journalism https://prospectingjournal.com/congress-must-act-to-preserve-the-future-of-local-journalism/ Mon, 16 May 2022 20:00:00 +0000 https://prospectingjournal.com/congress-must-act-to-preserve-the-future-of-local-journalism/ In 2022, with news from around the world available at the touch of a button, how do we stay informed about the events that shape our communities? Who shines the spotlight on the town hall or illuminates our choices at the polls? Who helps consumers when they are harmed or exposed to unsafe conditions in […]]]>

In 2022, with news from around the world available at the touch of a button, how do we stay informed about the events that shape our communities? Who shines the spotlight on the town hall or illuminates our choices at the polls? Who helps consumers when they are harmed or exposed to unsafe conditions in our neighborhoods? Who educated the public throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, avoided misinformation and helped us stay healthy?

Television and radio stations and the thousands of journalists they employ provide timely and reliable reporting on issues affecting the places where we live, work, learn and raise our families.

These journalists take their work and what it means to our country seriously. Inadequate local news has been linked to increased government corruption, less competitive elections and weaker municipal finances. The lack of local news can put lives at risk, fray the bonds of unity in our communities and weaken our democracy.

Unfortunately – and alarmingly – the economic base of local journalism is under attack.

Local broadcasters depend on advertising, especially from small businesses, to fund incredibly expensive newsgathering operations. However, today’s advertising market is now dominated by a handful of giant tech platforms – some of the richest companies in history with market caps that dwarf the entire advertising industry. publishing news. The media are facing daunting challenges in recouping this lost advertising revenue. Local broadcasters in smaller, rural markets, with fewer new advertisers they can attract to fill this revenue shortfall, have been particularly hard hit.

Local television and radio stations have continually adopted new forms of content distribution – including online streaming – to engage with their viewers, readers and listeners. Yet they have to compete with the monopoly power these tech giants wield over digital platforms as content gatekeepers.

How powerful are these tech companies? The Wall Street Journal recently reported last year, “when Facebook blocked news in Australia in response to potential legislation requiring platforms to pay publishers for content, it also took down pages for Australian hospitals, emergency services and charities. He publicly called the resulting chaos ‘inadvertent.’ Internal company whistleblowers, however, paint a different picture, alleging that the social media giant deliberately blocked the pages of these critical sources of information to “exercise maximum bargaining power over the Australian Parliament, which was passing the world’s first law that would require platforms such as Google and Facebook to pay media outlets for content.

News outlets have almost no influence when dealing with tech giants when it comes to the terms of compensation or display of online content on these platforms. Technology platforms may favor some news sources over others, such as national outlets over small publishers. They can place a factual story from a reputable medium next to flashy clickbait, seemingly misleading users about the quality of information they are consuming. They can set a minimum content length that exceeds a typical news segment before a video will receive compensation. They can group local journalism into general categories of “news” that advertisers choose to avoid, or they can exclude news publishers altogether from more lucrative advertising options. Digital platforms also alone control the distribution of revenue for monetized content, dictating to broadcasters and other news publishers how much they will receive for their content.

There is strong support among the American public for lawmakers to take action and preserve the future of local journalism. A recent national survey found that three-quarters of Americans think big tech companies drive small, local news outlets out of business, and four in five Americans say Congress is taking steps to give small, local publishers greater parity with large technology companies when negotiating the use of their content.

the Journalism Competition and Preservation Act (JCPA) would do just that, allowing local news outlets to come together to negotiate terms of access to their online content.

This bill, which has the support of lawmakers on both sides of the aisle, would help level the playing field for the media against these big tech companies.

Thanks to the senses. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.) and John Kennedy (R-La.) and Reps. David Cicilline (DR.I.) and Ken Buck (R-Colo.) for leading the charge for the JCPA and working to ensure the viability of local news in our communities.

News publishers across the country have come together to implore Congress to pass this much-needed legislation that would provide meaningful safeguards for fair negotiations between news publishers and mainstream digital platforms, create a fair deal that would benefit news consumers and allow local journalism to continue serving our communities.

Curtis LeGeyt is President and CEO of the National Association of Broadcasters.

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ARISE anchor Adefemi Akinsanya named among 85th class of Nieman Foundation Journalism Fellows – Arise News https://prospectingjournal.com/arise-anchor-adefemi-akinsanya-named-among-85th-class-of-nieman-foundation-journalism-fellows-arise-news/ Sat, 14 May 2022 06:07:34 +0000 https://prospectingjournal.com/arise-anchor-adefemi-akinsanya-named-among-85th-class-of-nieman-foundation-journalism-fellows-arise-news/ ARISE News international correspondent and presenter Adefemi Akinsanya has been selected alongside 23 other journalists from around the world for a year of study at Harvard University by the Nieman Foundation for Journalism. New Nieman Fellows will work on projects regarding government suppression of journalism, control of disinformation, climate change, migration and more. The Nieman […]]]>

ARISE News international correspondent and presenter Adefemi Akinsanya has been selected alongside 23 other journalists from around the world for a year of study at Harvard University by the Nieman Foundation for Journalism.

New Nieman Fellows will work on projects regarding government suppression of journalism, control of disinformation, climate change, migration and more.

The Nieman class of 2023 includes the foundation’s first Cambodian journalist, as well as others reporting on Ukraine, Russia, Afghanistan, Turkey, Myanmar, Bangladesh, India, Mexico , Nigeria and Hong Kong – places where press freedom is severely restricted or under attack and in urgent need of external support.

Akinsanya reported on several landmark events, from #EndSARS protests in Nigeria to Russia’s invasion of Ukraine.

At Havard, she will study how the deterioration of media freedom in her country is linked to the #EndSARS protests against police brutality. She will also work to build an information management platform to expand journalism jobs and help journalists tell stories about the marginalized.

The fellows, who will begin two semesters of study in August, represent a wide range of media, from a young start-up that reports on gender to older print and broadcast newsrooms.

The group includes correspondents, an investigative reporter, a CEO, presenters, editors, a photojournalist, a producer, and newsroom managers.

They cover race, voting rights, healthcare, politics, inequality, the environment, travel, sports and other issues.

“These remarkable journalists do essential work, often under constrained or hostile circumstances, and they probe industry conventions that need to be reinvented,” said Ann Marie Lipinski, curator of the Nieman Foundation. “I am honored to welcome them to Harvard and support their research and innovation. This fellowship has enhanced the work of journalists around the world, helped strengthen democracies, and has also contributed greatly to the Harvard community. We look forward to learning from this new class.

Since 1938, the Nieman Foundation has selected more than 1,700 journalists from 100 countries for fellowships at Harvard. In addition to taking courses at the university, Scholars participate in Nieman seminars, workshops and master classes, and collaborate with leading Harvard scholars and innovators in the Cambridge area.

Below is a list of the other 23 Nieman Scholars 2023 and their study plans:

Fahim Abeda former New York Times local reporter in Kabul, Afghanistan, who was evacuated from the country after the Taliban takeover in 2021, will study migration and American history with a focus on Asian migrants to the United States. States and the integration challenges they face.

Dotun Akintoyeeditor at ESPN, will research the War on Terror and the relationship between political violence and sport, examining events such as the 1972 Munich Games, the 1996 Atlanta Games, the Sri Lanka Marathon of 2008 and the Boston Marathon of 2013.

Sheikh Sabiha Alama senior reporter who covers crime and other issues for the daily Prothom Alo in Bangladesh, will study human rights atrocities and forced migration.

Amanda BeckerWashington correspondent for The 19th, a nonprofit newsroom that reports on gender, politics and politics, will study women’s news habits to understand gender differences and gender sensitivity. disinformation and participation in anti-democratic movements.

Deborah Berrynational correspondent for USA Today covering civil rights, voting rights and politics, will explore the pivotal role African-American women have played in local and national politics, from the civil rights movement to the Black Lives Matter movement, highlighting emphasis on voter registration and the exercise of elective office.

Olga Churakovaa moscow-based freelance journalist and host of the ‘hi, you’re a foreign agent’ podcast, will explore the plight of individual journalists decried as foreign agents or public enemies by governments trying to restrict their funding, reporting and impact.

Ash Dikshiteditor of BBC News Marathi in New Delhi, will explore methods to effectively diversify newsrooms in the country to be more inclusive of caste, religion, gender and sexuality, as well as ways to improve coverage of disadvantaged communities.

Pinar ErsoyEditorial Manager of the BBC Monitoring team in Istanbul, will examine successful newsroom innovation and transformation to identify solutions that can improve the quality of journalism globally.

Darryl sucksa writer who covers climate and environmental justice for the Washington Post, will study urban planning and public health to determine how historic federal and local zoning of industrial pollution sites intersects with poor health outcomes in communities of color.

Danny Fenster, editor of Frontier Myanmar, an investigative news magazine, will explore how journalists in exile are using emerging digital tools to continue reporting on repressive regimes, as well as the impact of Western foreign policy responses to these governments on the ability of journalists to continue working. Fenster was jailed by Myanmar’s junta for nearly six months in 2021 for his reporting on military-linked businesses.

Elizabeth GoodridgeAssociate Travel Editor for The New York Times, will reimagine travel writing and reporting that responds to the environmental and societal effects of travel on the warming planet.

Angie Drobnic Holaneditor of the Poynter Institute’s Pulitzer Prize-winning fact-checking website PolitiFact will explore whether journalism can have a causal effect on preserving democracy, and if so, how.

Renee KaplanHead of Digital Editorial Development at the Financial Times in London, will examine a new model of decentralized journalism focused on meeting the needs of a future audience that is more diverse, technologically savvy, content-rich and institutionally independent.

Natasha KhanAsia correspondent for the Hong Kong-based Wall Street Journal, will explore the acceleration of global inequality during the pandemic and how media organizations can advance coverage of stories from developing regions.

Tanya Kozyrevaan investigative journalist based in kyiv, Ukraine, will identify US regulatory loopholes that allow criminals to use cryptocurrencies to conceal and launder billions of dollars, as well as the impact of these crimes on workers in the States United and overseas.

Romy Neumarkcreator and host of the daily TV show “Night News” and host of a radio program at Kan, Israel’s public broadcasting company, will work to develop a large-scale training program for journalists that puts emphasis on culture and inclusion of professional newsrooms.

Bopha Phhorna journalist based in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, will explore how independent media organizations operating under oppressive regimes can collaborate to share information and resources to protect each other and elevate stories that matter.

Taras Prokopyshynpublisher and CEO of The Ukrainians Media in Lviv, Ukraine, will explore how to create sustainable independent media companies that deliver high-quality journalism in developing countries.

Kristofer Rios, director, multimedia journalist and producer at Muck Media, will study US media coverage of immigration and the role of empathy in reporting. It will create a framework of norms and practices to account for traditionally marginalized communities.

Moses Saman, a Spanish-American photojournalist and member of Magnum Photos, plans to explore how visual documentation of armed conflict is consumed, interpreted and, with the use of new technologies, manipulated to shape narratives.

Alex Smithhealth care reporter for Kansas City NPR station KCUR and national reporting partner of NPR-Kaiser Health News, will explore how journalists can effectively address health misinformation without spreading it further.

Ruth Tam“Dish City” podcast co-host and digital editor at WAMU in Washington, D.C., will explore how personal identity shapes journalism and research the rise of first-person writing, personal branding, and of public interest in the context of those delivering the news.

Jorge ValenciaThe World’s Latin America correspondent based in Mexico City, will explore narrative representations of migrants, with a focus on how news outlets can better portray them.

In addition to the new class members, Rebecca Richman Cohen will spend three months as a Nieman Visiting Fellow. Documentary filmmaker, founder of Racing Horse Productions and lecturer at Harvard Law School, she will examine the crisis of mass incarceration from various social science angles.
@rebeccaracing

The Fellows were selected by Nieman Curator Ann Marie Lipinski and Nieman Assistant Curator James Geary with assistance from 2021 Nieman Fellow Austin Bogues, USA Today Commentary Editor.

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The Newcastle Journal wins applause from Shearer on its 190th birthday https://prospectingjournal.com/the-newcastle-journal-wins-applause-from-shearer-on-its-190th-birthday/ Fri, 13 May 2022 05:52:51 +0000 https://prospectingjournal.com/the-newcastle-journal-wins-applause-from-shearer-on-its-190th-birthday/ Personalities have congratulated a regional daily for having brought information to their region for 190 years. Newcastle-based daily The Journal has celebrated its 190th anniversary, having been founded on May 12, 1832. Celebrities from the North East of England including former England footballer Alan Shearer and the Duke and Duchess of Northumberland are among those […]]]>

Personalities have congratulated a regional daily for having brought information to their region for 190 years.

Newcastle-based daily The Journal has celebrated its 190th anniversary, having been founded on May 12, 1832.

Celebrities from the North East of England including former England footballer Alan Shearer and the Duke and Duchess of Northumberland are among those who offered messages of congratulations as the newspaper marked the milestone.

The anniversary also featured on the front page of the Journal yesterday, pictured below.

Mr Shearer said: “Congratulations to the Journal on reaching the ripe old age of 190.

“It’s a North East institution and I’ve always appreciated the support the newspaper has given to the charities I’ve been involved with, such as the Alan Shearer Foundation and the Sir Bobby Robson Foundation.

“And, of course, I exchanged very regularly with journalists from the sports section.

“I hope The Journal will celebrate many more significant anniversaries in the decades to come and wish the team there the very best.”

In a joint statement, the Duke and Duchess added: “Reaching 190 is an incredible achievement for any business.

“While the landscape of how we get news has changed dramatically since the Journal’s inception, the newspaper continues to play a vital role in advocating for local businesses, highlighting important local issues and celebrating the many positive stories who come from our communities in the northeast.

“Congratulations to the Journal on its 190th anniversary.”

The Journal was set up by businessmen John Hernaman and Robert Perring at the request of local Tories to oppose Earl Gray’s Reform Bill, which reformed Parliament and gave the vote to many more men than before.

In an article tracing the history of the newspapereditor Graeme Whitfield wrote: “The North East we serve has changed significantly over the Journal’s history and the Journal has – contrary to its original mission – been politically neutral for many years.

“But in many ways its mission is the same as that envisioned by Mr Hernaman and Mr Perring when it started in 1832: to keep the people of Newcastle and the North East informed and entertained, to defend the best interests of the region and to hold power accountable.

“Few institutions last 190 years and we have no intention of stopping anytime soon.”

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SOPA announces finalists for 2022 Journalism Awards https://prospectingjournal.com/sopa-announces-finalists-for-2022-journalism-awards/ Wed, 11 May 2022 05:15:00 +0000 https://prospectingjournal.com/sopa-announces-finalists-for-2022-journalism-awards/ HONG KONG–(BUSINESS WIRE)–The Society of Publishers in Asia (SOPA), a Hong Kong-based non-profit organization dedicated to striving for excellence in journalism, today announced the finalists for the 2022 SOPA Awards for Editorial Excellence (full list here). International, regional and local media submitted over 750 entries in English and Chinese. SOPA celebrates the 40th anniversary of […]]]>

HONG KONG–(BUSINESS WIRE)–The Society of Publishers in Asia (SOPA), a Hong Kong-based non-profit organization dedicated to striving for excellence in journalism, today announced the finalists for the 2022 SOPA Awards for Editorial Excellence (full list here). International, regional and local media submitted over 750 entries in English and Chinese.

SOPA celebrates the 40th anniversary of its founding in Hong Kong in 1982. The annual awards for great journalism in the Asia-Pacific region have been awarded annually since 1999.

This year’s winners will be announced on June 16 at the virtual SOPA Awards Gala and streamed live on the SOPA Asia YouTube channel from 7 p.m. Hong Kong time. The evening will include Gina Chua, editor of media startup Semafor, whose career spans the South China Morning Post, Wall Street Journal and Reuters, in a fireside chat with Alice Su of The Economist, winner of the first SOPA Young Journalist Award last year. Juliette Saly of Bloomberg TV will host the event.

There are 20 categories, including the new SOPA Awards for Excellence in Audio Reporting and Excellence in Technology Reporting. The Investigative Reporting category has been renamed the “Carlos Tejada Award for Excellence in Investigative Reporting” to honor the life and work of our late member of the SOPA Editorial Board. Carlos, who died suddenly late last year, spent more than a decade in Asia, first for the Wall Street Journal and then for the New York Times, leading coverage of some of the biggest stories in region – many of whom were SOPA Laureates. He joined the committee in 2018.

This year, the Google News Initiative (GNI) for the first time funded award winners from small media outlets, including the Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism.

“The breadth and depth of the entries and the ambitious reporting that underpins them show that the journalistic spirit is alive and well in newsrooms across the region and around the world despite growing restrictions on freedom of speech. hurry. The SOPA Awards have played an important role in honoring these efforts that are critical to ensuring a thriving civil society across Asia,” said Madeleine Lim, Editor-in-Chief of Bloomberg News and Chair of SOPA’s Editorial Board.

The Wall Street Journal, Initium Media and WHYNOT (Radio Free Asia) are finalists for the prestigious SOPA Award for Public Service Journalism for their respective coverage of the origins of the COVID-19 pandemic, press freedom in Hong Kong and the Chinese feminist movement.

“In a sense, the year 2021 for journalism is the year of dangerous reporting. A considerable number of entries from this year focus on the aftermath of the coup in Myanmar, the takeover of Afghanistan by the Taliban, the ongoing ravages of the Covid-19 pandemic in the region and the profound transformation of Hong Kong. The finalists show how journalists overcame dangerous situations to produce fearless and rigorous media coverage,” said Ting Shi , Head of SOPA Judges and Senior Lecturer at HKU Journalism at the University of Hong Kong.

Entries were judged by a panel of industry professionals from leading media organizations and prestigious journalism schools around the world.

2022 award categories

  • Excellence in reporting on women’s issues

  • Excellence in Journalistic Innovation

  • Excellence in Audio Reporting

  • Excellence in Video Reporting

  • Excellence in Human Rights Reporting

  • Excellence in Writing Feature Films

  • Excellence in Technology Reporting

  • Excellence in Magazine Design

  • Excellence in arts and culture reporting

  • Excellence in the explanatory report

  • Excellence in Corporate Reporting

  • Excellence in Infographics

  • Excellence in breaking news reporting

  • Excellence in Opinion Writing

  • Excellence in Environmental Reporting

  • excellence in photography

  • The Scoop Award

  • Carlos Tejada Award for Excellence in Investigative Journalism

  • SOPA Prize for Young Journalists

  • SOPA Award for Public Service Journalism

The Platinum Sponsor of the SOPA 2022 Awards is Google News Initiative; Gold Sponsor is the Judith Neilson Institute for Journalism and Ideas; and the Silver sponsor is WP Engine.

About SOPA

The Society of Publishers in Asia (SOPA) is a Hong Kong-based non-profit organization that was founded in 1982 to uphold press freedom, promote excellence in journalism and endorse best practices for all platforms local and regional publishing companies in the Asia-Pacific region.

Today, SOPA is the voice of the Asian media and publishing industry, and continues to work to uphold media standards and freedoms while celebrating and supporting professional journalism and publishing. The SOPA Awards for Editorial Excellence are the annual flagship awards, serving as a regional benchmark for quality professional journalism.

www.sopasia.com; www.sopawards.com; LinkedIn

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Oklahoma journalism icon Joan Gilmore dies at 94 https://prospectingjournal.com/oklahoma-journalism-icon-joan-gilmore-dies-at-94/ Tue, 10 May 2022 00:01:19 +0000 https://prospectingjournal.com/oklahoma-journalism-icon-joan-gilmore-dies-at-94/ Joan Gilmore Oklahoma City lost a great friend on Monday. Joan Gilmore, who arrived in Oklahoma City in 1952 as a young reporter from Waukegan, Illinois, died at age 94, days before her May 14 birthday. In a career spanning more than half a century, Gilmore was more than just a journalist. She was a […]]]>

Joan Gilmore

Oklahoma City lost a great friend on Monday.

Joan Gilmore, who arrived in Oklahoma City in 1952 as a young reporter from Waukegan, Illinois, died at age 94, days before her May 14 birthday.

In a career spanning more than half a century, Gilmore was more than just a journalist. She was a true supporter of the Oklahoma City community, arts and culture throughout the state, and especially the people of Oklahoma. She was a journalist and columnist at The Oklahoma Daily for 28 years, then put in 30 more to Log recordingwhere his “Around Town” articles kept readers informed of important daily events and things to expect in the city.

“Joan Gilmore was an institution in Log recording and a strong advocate for the people of Oklahoma,” said Journal Record editor Joe Dowd. “Her voice was as authoritative as it was sympathetic, and she was a trusted source of information for thousands of readers for decades.”

Helen Sanger Wallace, a friend and colleague, said Gilmore was good at her job because she loved him so much.

“Joan has written about every event in Oklahoma City at one point or another. She covered fashion and parties, and interviewed movie stars and politicians with such ease and loved being part of the social scene,” Wallace said. “We lost a good one today, Joan Gilmore, my first editor at Oklahoma and my mentor over the years.

Gilmore helped found Leadership Oklahoma City and was deeply involved in community organizations ranging from the Oklahoma City Ballet to the Children’s Hospital Foundation. As she was being considered for induction into the Oklahoma Women’s Hall of Fame, another friend, Marion Paden, described her as a ‘rock star’ who made it her mission to challenge the status quo. .

“Joan and I had been friends and neighbors for over 25 years. From the start, I was inspired by her drive and determination, her commitment to her community, and her tireless efforts to advance and support women. There isn’t a single significant event or organization in our community that she hasn’t helped create, promote or support,” Paden said. “If I was asked to help write a book about her life, I would add a sentence or two about how she beat esophageal cancer, how quickly she sent a thank you note and about how she loved her husband Al and so many of us so dearly. I was so lucky and so grateful to be her friend.

According to an article published around the time Gilmore won a Journal Record Lifetime Award, she covered everything from backyard barbecues to a boxing match in New York’s Madison Square Garden to a fashion show in Europe. She has written over 1,500 news stories, covered over 10,000 weddings, and written over a million words to benefit the Oklahoma City community.

“I came to Oklahoma City as a ‘Damned Yankee’ but it didn’t take too long to become a real Okie,” Gilmore wrote in his final column for the Journal Record in August 2020. “Reporters benefit sometimes special treatment. I remember petting a cheetah, feeding a rhino, riding a camel in Morocco, chatting with Tom Selleck in our own Cowboy Hall of Fame and Western Heritage Center, and riding in the sub- sailor from Oklahoma.

“God was good when he led me to Oklahoma City in 1952 and led me toOklahomathen to the smart business newspaper,Log recording. My career has been so much more exciting and satisfying than I could have imagined and all myLog recordreaders. I hope you will miss me too.

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World Press Freedom Day 2022: Journalism matters more than ever https://prospectingjournal.com/world-press-freedom-day-2022-journalism-matters-more-than-ever/ Wed, 04 May 2022 23:33:39 +0000 https://prospectingjournal.com/world-press-freedom-day-2022-journalism-matters-more-than-ever/ Map of the World Press Freedom Index. “Freedom of the press is defined as the ability of journalists as individuals and collectives to select, produce and disseminate information in the public interest free from political, economic, legal and social interference and in the absence of threats to their physical and mental safety. ” Reporters Without […]]]>
Map of the World Press Freedom Index.

“Freedom of the press is defined as the ability of journalists as individuals and collectives to select, produce and disseminate information in the public interest free from political, economic, legal and social interference and in the absence of threats to their physical and mental safety. ” Reporters Without Borders.

I started this article a week ago when, to my amazement, a well-placed and respected expert in his field, after telling me about a particular environmental condition, called me several hours later and m ‘ informed that he had been told he could not speak to the press unless two people in his field approved – not experts in the field, by the way. To say I was surprised is an understatement. He is a person with whom I have had a long, long and trusting relationship for almost 20 years. This person has never been shy about speaking publicly with me or anyone else. It was not a controversial subject. What he had to say was not controversial. Unless you consider climate change controversial. (I suggest that the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change shut down any conspiracy theories about this). The short version is that he was muzzled by a non-governmental agency that seems determined to control his message. Harmless enough, one might think.

Life and weather have changed, which forced me to suspend the article until today, when I attended a live discussion on the Washington Post with two Russian journalists and a US senator who showed up on my radar by chance on Monday.

The discussion began with a report which had been published by Reporters Without Borders which ranked 180 countries on the freedom of their press. The United States ranked 43 just behind Berkina Faso at 42 and ahead of South Korea at 44. North Korea was last in the 180 spot, but a search of the list also ranked Russia at 180.

The two Russian journalists Tikhon Dzyadko and Ekaterina Kotrikadze who had fled their country with their two children on March 4 two days before the Russian invasion of Ukraine spoke with frankness and courage about the country they love and have left behind them.

While Putin’s Russia hasn’t really been seen as a hotbed for press freedom, the couple who work for tv rain, an independent Russian television channel founded in 2010, were allowed to report without direct threat or censorship, they said. Until August 2021 when TV Rain was shut down. They said that most journalists and producers left the country at that time.

Although a Google search shows that TV Rain closed on August 5, Dzyadko and Kotrikadze said they continue to report and communicate with their compatriots on some of the social media channels, including YouTube, that Russia was not able to completely obscure.

As the whole world focuses on the results of authoritarianism-turned-dictatorship emanating from Moscow while connecting it to what Trump has done in the United States under the false accusation of fake news, it is important to see how many Less dramatic slights can nonetheless undermine the community’s Constitution. The right to know. It also fuels the cynicism that leads to passivity and dismal voter turnout among young people.

There is a bigger problem, however. During Tuesday’s discussion, when asked by the moderator how the United States could have fallen to 43rd on the Freedom Index, Democratic Senator Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota responded immediately. “We don’t have enough local newspapers,” adding that over the past few years “we’ve lost 2,200 community newspapers.” Meanwhile, the monopolistic social media companies that sucked up the advertising dollars that these newspapers relied on made an estimated $2 trillion. “Something smells really bad here,” Klobuchar said.

The truth is challenged or even murdered in many dramatic ways, as evidenced by Putin’s gagging of all journalism in Russia until the murder of Jamal Khashoggi and many other journalists, which are chilling in scope and intent. This is what Trump did effectively, without resorting to this level of violence, with his false speech. The intention is to allow corporations, oligarchs and billionaires to take over our world while the rest of us choke on their fumes. Journalism and a bunch of brave, principled, underpaid journalists are the army that can fight the battles over and over again that seek to cover up the truth I’ve spoken about is driven by facts, attribution and trust .

What we do in the territory to control the press is much less dramatic. It’s even a little uncomfortable to compare it to Russia and Saudi Arabia and many other places where journalists have been imprisoned or killed this year and in years past. But reporters interviewed by The Washington Post said they were allowed to do their TV show until last August. When the boom is lowered, it descends rapidly.

So back to our house version of media contempt. Requests for public records, phone calls to public information officers, registration citations, are ignored unanswered and blocked.

It was shocking to me years ago when I called the FBI and left a message and within 15 minutes someone called me back and answered my questions. Shocking. I had become so used to being “ghosted”, as the millennials say, by much of the territory’s agencies and institutions that it was enlightening to see, at least at the time, how things were done. somewhere else.

Here is the good news. While other communities have seen their local newspapers dry up and soar, we have three high-circulation newspapers in the US Virgin Islands.

And at least one of them has made a point over the years as part of the responsibility of being the first and only Internet-only newspaper in the Virgin Islands to also report the good news.

As disconcerting as it may seem given the front pages of most major newspapers in the United States and around the world, the fact is that the world has never been more violent. Keeping people scared, like Putin did by threatening nuclear war and even having his cronies in the fake news business show videos of what it would be like if one of their nuclear missiles decimated the Great -Britain and Ireland, supposedly sells Newspapers – and Television Advertising..

Over the years, when incomes were hard to come by and journalists were sometimes without pay for months, the Source always resisted the temptation to put up a pay wall. Thank goodness our community has seen the value of our reliable reporting and has been supporting us with advertising and donations for over 20 years. It’s not my intention to make this article exclusively about the Source, but one of the ways to keep the media free and healthy over the years, suggested by Klobuchar, was one we considered a long time ago. Make the Source a non-profit association. My answer was that it already was. Also, raising money through grants and other fundraising campaigns didn’t seem any easier to me than raising money through ad sales, which I at least had experience with. The other option that was suggested by many pundits as mainstream and local newspapers were dropping like flies was to follow the lead of the government owned and supported BBC.

Klobuchar, to his credit, has introduced several bills that would tag both government funds and monopoly treasure chests to support legitimate journalism.

And to their credit, Kotrikadze and Dzyadko insisted they didn’t want to quit being journalists despite the risks, despite the uncertainty, despite the lack of regular or reasonable compensation.

“Who will fight for democracy,” Kotrikadze said, as her toddler could be heard laughing in the background.

(Shutterstock)

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Bonnie Jean Feldkamp: How journalism is looking for its iPod fix | Opinions https://prospectingjournal.com/bonnie-jean-feldkamp-how-journalism-is-looking-for-its-ipod-fix-opinions/ Mon, 02 May 2022 19:05:00 +0000 https://prospectingjournal.com/bonnie-jean-feldkamp-how-journalism-is-looking-for-its-ipod-fix-opinions/ It’s no secret that journalism is in trouble. Information deserts exist where local publications have retreated, and in other places corporate ownership has replaced local family newspapers. policy dating back to of President Richard Nixon the administration and beyond has played its part. Don’t get me wrong, this is not a partisan thing: every American […]]]>

It’s no secret that journalism is in trouble. Information deserts exist where local publications have retreated, and in other places corporate ownership has replaced local family newspapers.

policy dating back to of President Richard Nixon the administration and beyond has played its part.

Don’t get me wrong, this is not a partisan thing: every American president has been involved in dismantling our free press.

Since by Ronald Regan end of the Fairness Doctrinewhich applied to broadcasting licenses, by Bill Clinton clean Telecommunications Lawand of by Barack Obama the undoubtedly excessive use of the Espionage Act and that of Donald Trump Outright contempt for journalists with its oft-used phrase “fake news,” presidents on both sides of the aisle have gotten their hands on the workings of America’s media.

There is plenty of room to point fingers at American systems. by Brian Karem book, release the press: The death of American journalism and how to revive it, is a good starting point for a deep dive through history on these points. Full disclosure: I wrote a blurb for the book jacket.

The rise of the Internet has also eroded the way the public consumes information. Newspaper resources that paid for quality journalism have all but disappeared. If you are looking for a job, you are no longer buying a newspaper, you are looking for job portals and applications. Public notices moved to websites and ad sales declined. Newsrooms shrank with him.

Now, at least for the newspaper where I work, our concentration is refined. Our goal is to provide our community with local content that is meaningful and important to their daily lives.

Also, with the rise of the Internet, it seems that we now have two different types of readers:

The reader who grew up with newspapers is frustrated to see print publications dwindle and their news outdated. Breaking news in a printed newspaper no longer happens. This demographic feels forgotten and irrelevant as the news cycle focuses on their digital audience. Press subscriptions and advertisers supporting the newspaper’s production plummet. It’s an expected death.

The reader who grew up in the Internet age has a different problem. They expect to read quality journalism for free. Hitting a paywall is a nuisance, and many find out what they want to learn or read from links shared on social media. A digital subscription as cheap as $1 for six months is a tough sell. It’s not a sustainable business model.

Non-profit investigative journalism organizations have sprung up across the country and they are filling a real need in our communities. When communities no longer have a reporter sitting in every courtroom or city council meeting, we have people in power who are not held to account.

Access to public records and scrutiny of public policy are imperative. The lack of resources to provide this locally is an effective nut against our free press.

While nonprofit journalism is a welcome palliative, it cannot be the solution. Non-profit work tends to highlight gaps in our systems.

Journalism is looking for its iPod. Let me explain. Remember that around the turn of the century, when the internet age was beginning and music lovers were burning playlists onto blank CDs, two young people came along and developed a file sharing system called Napster: file sharing software with ethical issues that did not take into account the digital rights of the artist.

It had a quick and profound effect on the music industry. itunes and the iPod has revolutionized the way we consume music.

Journalism and the way America consumes its information is now at the heart of the news. In some ways, social media is our Napster. As in the music industry, song quality and delivery expectations are subjective. But you won’t find journalists on stage America’s Got Talent.

May 3 is world press freedom day. Hopefully America values ​​its free press as much as it does its music and better distribution solutions start to surface.

Bonnie Jean Feldkamp is a wife, mother of three children and editor of the newspaper Pulitzer Prize-winner Louisville Courier-Journal. She can be contacted at [email protected]followed to the end his YouTube channel and on Twitter: @WriterBonnieor click here to learn more about her. Click here for previous columns. The opinions expressed are his own.

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Publisher bids farewell to Midsomer Norton & Radstock Journal https://prospectingjournal.com/publisher-bids-farewell-to-midsomer-norton-radstock-journal/ Fri, 29 Apr 2022 07:22:27 +0000 https://prospectingjournal.com/publisher-bids-farewell-to-midsomer-norton-radstock-journal/ An editor has bid farewell to the newspaper she served for nearly 19 years. Rebecca Brooks is leaving her post at Midsomer Norton & Radstock Journal, where she had worked since September 2004 and held the editor’s chair for nine years. Rebecca leaves Somerset every week to take on a new role in the local […]]]>

An editor has bid farewell to the newspaper she served for nearly 19 years.

Rebecca Brooks is leaving her post at Midsomer Norton & Radstock Journal, where she had worked since September 2004 and held the editor’s chair for nine years.

Rebecca leaves Somerset every week to take on a new role in the local charity sector and will be replaced by Lucy Slade.

Lucy, pictured, joined Tindle in 2019 after leaving the University of Bath Spa.

In a farewell editorialRebecca thanked Journal readers for their “incredible” support since the first coronavirus lockdown in 2020 prompted the owner of Tindle Newspapers to temporarily cease publication for six months.

She wrote, “Now that the newspaper is back on its feet and I’m no longer a single 20-something who can work all hours of the day and night, it’s time someone new took over the reins. .

“Additionally, I was offered an amazing opportunity to work in the local charity sector.

“Although I’m really sad to leave my dear colleagues, I’m so excited about this next step in my career.”

Lucy, who will officially take on the title of content editor, will be assisted in running the Journal by advertising manager Sarah Shipley, whose father Steve started the journal.

Steve, who died in 2017, was working for Fosseway Press in 1980 when the company decided to take advantage of a strike at the Somerset Guardian and launch a competing publication.

Tindle Newspapers then purchased the Journal in October 2003.

Rebecca added: “I’d like to take a moment to pay tribute to the Shipley family – Steve saw a gap in the market during the printing strikes in the 80s and that’s how we ended up with our brilliant free community newspaper we have today.

“To all the locals who stayed up all night assembling the paper by hand and then delivering it, I salute you.”

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Media mogul Steven Swartz discusses the state of journalism and what drew him to Sarasota https://prospectingjournal.com/media-mogul-steven-swartz-discusses-the-state-of-journalism-and-what-drew-him-to-sarasota/ Mon, 25 Apr 2022 18:13:32 +0000 https://prospectingjournal.com/media-mogul-steven-swartz-discusses-the-state-of-journalism-and-what-drew-him-to-sarasota/ Warm weather and world-famous beaches have made Sarasota a destination for influential showbiz and political figures and, most recently, Steven Swartz, president and CEO of the publishing company Hearst. If you haven’t heard the name, you will recognize the wallet. The software and media giant is one of the largest magazine publishers […]]]>



Warm weather and world-famous beaches have made Sarasota a destination for influential showbiz and political figures and, most recently, Steven Swartz, president and CEO of the publishing company Hearst.

If you haven’t heard the name, you will recognize the wallet. The software and media giant is one of the largest magazine publishers in the world, with titles like Cosmopolitan, Bazaar and Squireas well as 76 newspapers across the country, including the Houston Chronicle and the San Francisco Chronicle. Hearst also owns cable television networks A&E, History, Lifetime and ESPN, and has interests in medical information and services companies, and provides software for managing jets and helicopters. Last year, according to ForbesHearst’s annual revenues reached $11.5 billion.

That same year, Swartz, 60, bought a $5.7 million condo on Longboat Key with his wife, Tina, and now splits his time between the waterfront and New York City, where Hearst is headquartered.

We caught up with the mogul to talk about Longboat Key, the future of media and (why not?) carrot cake:

How long have you been in the media?

“Since 1984, when I graduated from Harvard and joined the the wall street journal as a journalist.”

What drew you to Sarasota?

“We had been coming to the area for about 20 years. Friends of ours bought a house in South Sarasota and we had fond memories of bringing our kids to Siesta Key. the area, the natural beauty, and the cool modernism of downtown Sarasota. It seemed like a very welcoming, friendly, and relaxed environment. When we became empty nests, we were looking to play golf and have our kids visit us in a place they loved and naturally we turned to Sarasota.Our main residence is still in New York, but we come down as often as we can.

Do you think newspapers and magazines will be there for the next generation of readers?

“We are very optimistic about the magazine and newspaper industry. Obviously both have seen a lot of changes. Every publication has to find the right frequency – some are quarterly, some are monthly. is more digital now and it is important that publications of all advancements have deep digital relationships and have different ways of generating revenue, through e-commerce, advertisements and subscriptions.Magazines and newspapers are sources reliable information and can lead readers to find quality products and services and I think that can be a good thing for them. The future must be a mix of revenue streams and a mix of print and digital products and I am convinced that the media can execute this.

How has the pandemic affected Hearst’s publications portfolio?

“2020 has been a tough year for the publishing side. But about half of our business is now B2B [business-to-business] data and software and other interests such as Fitch Group. [Editor’s note: Fitch is a global ​​financial information services company Hearst owns.] We also have healthcare, aviation, and transportation businesses. The B2B side has remained strong throughout the pandemic. For the media part, when you think back to that time, we couldn’t get out a lot and our advertising businesses were affected, but they all came back very strong in 2021, leading to record results and a great start in 2022. recovery has caught up with us.”

What do you think are the main problems facing journalists today?

“I think the public has legitimate questions about bias coming largely from cable news networks that have taken strong political positions. I think the vast majority of people want to be sure that organizations are credible and address news from a factual angle and that’s exactly what we do with our print and television news.

“I think it’s more difficult for journalists today, but it’s also exciting. For example, they have so many tools to do data journalism and search so many databases in a way that we couldn’t do at the time. The Wall Street Journal, we just didn’t have access to those tools. I think there are still great careers to be had working for magazines and newspapers, but I understand that some journalists go out on their own and build their own brand and their own digital channels and blogs or subscriptions. I think there are many paths they can take.”

Many national outlets are thriving, but many local and regional publications are not. How can they bounce back?

“We believe there will always be a place for strong local news.

“We have over 20 newspapers across the country and they also had a rebound year in 2021. The business has gotten tougher, but we continue to invest in journalism because it’s important and we’re doing very well. well with digital subscriptions. We believe our local newspapers will remain strong. We are also a big supporter of local TV news. We have 33 stations across the country.

Should journalists tweet as much and become, in essence, brands?

“I think they have to be very careful. There’s nothing wrong with using social media platforms, but I think what people crave is journalists giving people the facts. I think a lot of bias and opinions seep into social media and they need to be careful unless they are opinionated journalists It’s best to just tell people about the edited and verified story they wish to share. The public’s perception of bias can harm their credibility and journalists should keep this in mind.”

Have you been to the Haye Loft at Euphemia Haye?

“Yes, I loved the carrot cake.”

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