Journalism – Prospecting Journal http://prospectingjournal.com/ Sun, 28 Nov 2021 11:17:39 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://prospectingjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-120x120.png Journalism – Prospecting Journal http://prospectingjournal.com/ 32 32 The latest threat to northern journalism https://prospectingjournal.com/the-latest-threat-to-northern-journalism/ Sun, 28 Nov 2021 11:03:15 +0000 https://prospectingjournal.com/the-latest-threat-to-northern-journalism/ ALBANY – It’s hard to determine which obnoxious creature most resembles Alden Global Capital. Ticks, leeches and other leeches are usually too small to cause the wreckage that the secret hedge fund is infamous for. They are more often a nuisance than a killer. A vulture ? Of course, we’ve all heard of “vulture hedge […]]]>

ALBANY – It’s hard to determine which obnoxious creature most resembles Alden Global Capital.

Ticks, leeches and other leeches are usually too small to cause the wreckage that the secret hedge fund is infamous for. They are more often a nuisance than a killer.

A vulture ? Of course, we’ve all heard of “vulture hedge funds”, but I don’t think that’s entirely true. Vultures usually eat the dead, while Alden prey on living businesses.

So I’ll go with the boa constrictor, a snake that gains strength by feasting on the living before going in search of its next victim.

Yes, that’s Alden for a T.

Sadly, the serpentine hedge fund has quietly become a major owner of US newspapers, employing a fine profit strategy of cutting costs, gutting staff, selling real estate and increasing subscription costs. Decline in readership inevitably follows, of course, as the newspaper fades to inevitable death.

This business model, if it can be called that, will be recognizable to anyone who saw the decline of Troy Record, Saratogian, and Kingston Freeman after Alden wrapped all three in his embrace.

“It’s well documented that their goal is to get every penny they can from local produce without worrying about local news,” said Barbara Lombardo, who worked for the Saratogian for 38 years and was the newspaper’s editor when Alden was came to town in 2012.

As part of the squeeze, Lombardo was eventually made the record editor, and she watched him and the Saratogian weakened by cut after cut. Unable to take it any longer, she accepted a buyout offer in 2015, retiring before she had expected.

“The staff was downsized so severely that I didn’t feel proud of what I was producing,” said Lombardo. “There are talented and dedicated journalists who continue to work in these newspapers, but they are working with too few resources.”

Today, the Record does not even have an office in Troy while the Saratogian site gives a mailing address in … Massachusetts. I hate to say it, but both are examples of the wreckage Alden left in cities across the country.

Another is the Chicago Tribune. It was a profitable newspaper when it was acquired by Alden earlier this year, but you can guess what happened next.

The new owners “emptied the place,” according to a profile of Alden published last month by The Atlantic. The magazine went on to describe how “one of America’s most famous newspapers” was quickly “reduced to a newsroom the size of a chipotle.”

It’s a grim reading. More depressing is learning that the Manhattan-headquartered hedge fund may not be finished with upstate New York.

Alden is now heading to Lee Enterprises, which owns, among many other newspapers across the country, the Glens Falls Post-Star, Auburn Citizen and Buffalo News.

“Our interest in Lee is a reaffirmation of our substantial commitment to the newspaper industry and our desire to support local newspapers over the long term,” the hedge fund wrote in a letter to Lee’s board of directors.

Yes, it’s true. Relax. The boa only wants to give you a warm hug.

According to the Wall Street Journal, Lee responded to the takeover bid by adopting a shareholder rights plan that is expected to delay a potential acquisition by at least a year. Yet there is no doubt that Alden poses a very real threat to Lee’s newspapers and the communities they serve.

Yes, the newspapers had problems before Alden started to take it over. As everyone knows, the internet has radically changed the business model and Alden is not the first owner to impose the cuts.

Ken Tingley, former editor of the Post-Star, was there as the debt-ridden Lee imposed cuts. But this business, he said, is nothing like Alden.

“I’ve always felt Lee cared about journalism and their communities,” Tingley said. “When you see something like Alden happening, you think, Oh my God, there won’t be any concern for journalism and local communities.”

I know newspapers aren’t the only businesses destroyed by predatory hedge funds. The destructive side of modern capitalism is not a new story.

And of course, polls showing declining media confidence suggest that many Americans are not saddened by the gutted newspapers. The media must restore confidence, I know that.

But please understand that what Alden is doing is undeniably sinister. It’s bad for the country, bad for democracy.

As the Atlantic article noted, studies show that political corruption and government budgets skyrocket when local media coverage disappears. Voter turnout and civic engagement are declining. This is the big picture.

On a more basic level, it’s just good to know what’s going on where you live. Connecting to each other and to our communities is important and gives meaning to our lives, which is why I am convinced that there will always be a market for local news.

Newspapers like the Post-Star and the Buffalo News may have a bright future, despite all the difficulties the industry has faced. They can make their hometown better places. But not if Alden takes their lives first.

cchurchill@timesunion.com ■ 518-454-5442 ■ @chris_churchill


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Photographer celebrates 40 years with the Yorkshire Post https://prospectingjournal.com/photographer-celebrates-40-years-with-the-yorkshire-post/ Fri, 26 Nov 2021 09:39:41 +0000 https://prospectingjournal.com/photographer-celebrates-40-years-with-the-yorkshire-post/ A regional press photographer celebrates his 40th birthday with the newspaper he joined as an intern in 1981. Gary Longbottom says he’s still excited to document life through his patch after completing four decades with the Yorkshire Post. Starting as an intern in 1981 after a stint working for a photographic agency, Gary has covered […]]]>

A regional press photographer celebrates his 40th birthday with the newspaper he joined as an intern in 1981.

Gary Longbottom says he’s still excited to document life through his patch after completing four decades with the Yorkshire Post.

Starting as an intern in 1981 after a stint working for a photographic agency, Gary has covered many great news and sporting events over the years, including the Kegworth Air Disaster and Leeds United’s European Adventures.

“I’ve been with Leeds United to Rome, Prague and the Netherlands among others,” Gary said, in the photo.

“I covered the good news and the bad news. I have photographed the Pope in York and the Royal Family on several occasions, including Diana.

“I covered the Kegworth air disaster and a lot of other big news.”

Gary, born in Leeds, married to Joan and father of two daughters and 16-month-old granddaughter, Emelia, started taking photos as a teenager.

He added: “I have always had a camera and took a lot of pictures of trains. Technology has changed dramatically over the years.

“The first camera I had as a professional didn’t even have a driving wind and no autofocus. Now all of our cameras are digital.

“I always like to go out and take pictures. Traveling takes a long time for us because Yorkshire is a big county, but the roads are a lot busier than when I started.


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Holiday gift idea: Support journalism (letter) | Letters to the Editor https://prospectingjournal.com/holiday-gift-idea-support-journalism-letter-letters-to-the-editor/ Wed, 24 Nov 2021 10:00:00 +0000 https://prospectingjournal.com/holiday-gift-idea-support-journalism-letter-letters-to-the-editor/ Are supply chain issues making it difficult to find the holiday gifts you want to buy? Does inflation give you sticker shock if you find these freebies? Are you tired of the disinformation circulating unchecked on social media? Have you lost your patience with the local TV news, which is mostly commercials for hospitals? Here’s […]]]>

Are supply chain issues making it difficult to find the holiday gifts you want to buy? Does inflation give you sticker shock if you find these freebies? Are you tired of the disinformation circulating unchecked on social media? Have you lost your patience with the local TV news, which is mostly commercials for hospitals?

Here’s an idea: Support verified investigative journalism and coverage of local sports, news stories, news, and more by gifting an LNP membership to a friend, neighbor, or relative who is not currently a subscriber. Go old-fashioned and gift a print edition subscription that includes the digital version.

When you read the newspaper, you will see and read a lot more than reading online, guaranteed. (See the Customer Service section on the LancasterOnline website or call the office at 717-291-8611 for subscription information.)

In case you were wondering, I have no connection with LNP other than being a paid subscriber. I don’t like everything I see in the paper, but I really believe Lancaster is a much better place because we have a real serious everyday life. Do your part so that we don’t lose this precious resource.

Thomas simpson

Lancaster

To subscribe to LNP | LancasterOnline visit https://lancasteronline.com/site/subscribe/


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Honest Evangelism Needs Honest Journalism https://prospectingjournal.com/honest-evangelism-needs-honest-journalism/ Mon, 22 Nov 2021 10:30:00 +0000 https://prospectingjournal.com/honest-evangelism-needs-honest-journalism/ Almost two decades ago, I was asked to become editor-in-chief of the weekly published by the Japanese Conference of Catholic Bishops. My first reaction was a gut-aching laugh. When I caught my breath, I said to the priest who had been sent to present the proposal: “Look at my face! It was indeed unprecedented to […]]]>

Almost two decades ago, I was asked to become editor-in-chief of the weekly published by the Japanese Conference of Catholic Bishops.

My first reaction was a gut-aching laugh. When I caught my breath, I said to the priest who had been sent to present the proposal: “Look at my face! It was indeed unprecedented to ask a non-Japanese to run a newspaper in Japanese.

Later, I met the bishop who was the newspaper liaison and asked him if I would have the kind of editorial freedom and authority that is usual for a newspaper editor. He replied, “As long as you don’t start publishing heresy, you have this freedom. Test us.

I accepted the job and soon after we had the first test.

A bishop had been prosecuted in a case that was never mentioned in any Catholic media. The only coverage was in a local secular newspaper and a Buddhist newspaper. The Catholics in his diocese who knew the history were mostly silenced.

When the bishop lost the case, I told my staff it was news, but since the whole affair had been kept from the Catholics, we had to do an article that explained its background and history. When reporters showed hesitation, I assured them that the only risky job was mine. The story made headlines.

Sexual abuse by clergy and cover-ups by those in leadership positions highlighted by secular media

On the day it was printed, the bishop who told me to test the bishops was in Tokyo and invited the priests who worked at the bishops’ conference to join him for dinner before he returned home. in his diocese.

When dessert came out, the bishop called my name. Immediately every fork and cup of coffee fell as the priests waited to hear what was to follow.

“Your predecessor [who had come to the newspaper from a magazine put out by his religious order] would not have printed this story.

I replied, “My predecessor was not trying to run a newspaper.

“Yes, but we wanted to. “

Everyone returned to their dessert and their coffee.

A few days later, a package arrived from the bishop who was the subject of the story. It contained his papers relating to the case as well as a note saying that he would not appeal the verdict and that I had free use of the papers if I felt additional coverage was needed.

My mother once complained about a totally different relationship between the Catholic press and a prelate in her diocesan newspaper: “There were nine photos of the bishop on the first 11 pages! I guess none of the photos illustrated an article about a trial.

Pope Francis recently honored two journalists whose “beat” includes the Vatican. Neither works for a Church-related news agency. During the ceremony, the Pope thanked all the journalists who underlined “what is wrong with the Church”.

With few exceptions, media unrelated to the Church have rendered this service. Sexual abuse by the clergy and cover-ups by people in positions of responsibility have been highlighted by secular media. There are other stories that will be told sooner or later, but probably not in Church-related media.

Objective, professional and frankly honest Catholic sources of information are scarce. François praised journalists, but the institution still does not want real journalism

When independent Church-related news outlets tried to present these stories, they were attacked by those claiming to “protect the Church”, although this was more often than not an exercise in self-defense. Non-independent sources print photos of bishops.

Objective, professional and frankly honest Catholic sources of information are scarce. François praised journalists, but the institution still does not want real journalism.

Two thousand years ago, when journalism did not yet exist, Jesus showed the hypocrisy of those who wielded power among and against believers. Today, that is part of the vocation of journalism.

If that does not happen today, if the Church’s communications are just public relations, the Church and her mission will suffer.

We are all embarrassed when, as is inevitable, the corruption and scandal that has been hidden is exposed by others. The decreasing number of those with high expectations are outraged. Idealists who might otherwise choose a life of Church service shy away from an institution that values ​​cover-up over truth. Some leave the Church in disgust.

Compared to all of this, how can Church officials claim that bad press, even (or mostly) when it is true, is a problem?

The biggest problem is the loss of credibility of the Church’s true message, the gospel. The Church is in desperate need of honest, objective, and professional sources of information, otherwise they will be of no use in proclaiming the gospel. Such honesty, while embarrassing at times, will also be a confirmation to the world that we are attached to the truth and therefore worthy of some trust.

The bishops of Japan knew that presenting the full picture of the Church is ultimately a service to the People of God and to the Gospel. Shouldn’t other Church leaders learn from them?

* The opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the official editorial position of UCA News.

Support UCA News …

… .As we move into the final months of 2021, we ask readers like you to help us keep UCA News free.

For 40 years, UCA News has remained Asia’s most trusted and independent Catholic news and information service. Every week, we publish nearly 100 news exclusive and in-depth reports, features, commentary, podcasts and video broadcasts, developed from a world view and the Church through discerning Catholic eyes.

Our journalistic standards are as high as those of the quality press; we are particularly focused on a rapidly growing part of the world – Asia – where in some countries the Church is growing faster than pastoral resources can meet – South Korea, Vietnam and India for n ‘name just three.

And UCA News has the advantage of having in its ranks local reporters covering 23 countries in South, South-East and East Asia. We report the stories of the local people and their experiences in a way that the Western media simply does not have the resources to reach. And we report the dawning life of new Churches in ancient lands where being Catholic can sometimes be very dangerous.

With declining support from financial partners in Europe and the United States, we need to appeal for support from those who benefit from our work.

Click here to find out how you can support UCA News. You can tell the difference for as little as US $ 5 …


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The best movies and TV shows of 2021 https://prospectingjournal.com/the-best-movies-and-tv-shows-of-2021/ Sat, 20 Nov 2021 15:45:00 +0000 https://prospectingjournal.com/the-best-movies-and-tv-shows-of-2021/ Storm Lake Times reporter Tom Cullen reports on the 2020 Iowa Caucuses. Michael potter It’s 9:35 a.m. in Storm Lake, Iowa, and Art Cullen steps out for a cigarette. Its reporters still do this thing. Not delivering their copy on time, taking too long to polish sentences, and more or less not sufficiently grasping the […]]]>

It’s 9:35 a.m. in Storm Lake, Iowa, and Art Cullen steps out for a cigarette. Its reporters still do this thing. Not delivering their copy on time, taking too long to polish sentences, and more or less not sufficiently grasping the kind of existential realities that befall the editor of one. of the last living dinosaurs in journalism. Which is another way of putting it, Cullen’s is a bi-weekly family print newspaper that has been around since the Paleozoic era of the industry. A dinosaur which, until now, has defied the internet asteroid, despite the danger of extinction it carries.

The first sound you hear in Storm Lake – a new documentary on Storm Lake Times, a newspaper with a circulation of around 3,000 readers – is the snap of computer keyboards. But that morning, their musicality seemingly belies a lack of proper speed. “I’m really worried about the deadlines,” Cullen said, after stepping out for a smoke break.

He takes a puff of his cigarette, his back to the camera. Then turns around.

“Every hour we’re late costs us $ 100.”

Another trail.

“You know …” and here, he throws a blissful smile at the camera of the documentary filmmaker who has become essential in his writing. “Jesus, you’ve been doing this for 40 years, and people still don’t know what time it is.”

On one level, this was a joke to anonymous reporters whose deadlines were disputed. But it also talks about everything that goes on outside of the family newsroom and littered with papers from Storm Lake Times. Exactly what time is it in journalism today, when the old rules that brought us here can sometimes seem ill-equipped to prevent walls from closing and putting endless journalists out of work? “My brother founded the newspaper in 1990,” Cullen said at one point in this documentary, one of the best 2021 movies and TV shows about the profession. “With the belief that honest reporting would attract a crowd. He has.” But it will not be indefinitely.

At this point, we enter what has become a depressing old story. And this story only ends in two ways. Either the venerable press institutions continue to die. Or, like Blanche DuBois, they keep hanging on. By relying on the kindness of strangers.

As a result, 2021 has produced several TV shows and films, such as Storm Lake, which each in their own way clearly shows how necessary a strong journalistic enterprise is for the civic life of a place. Also, how vital the profession is in the world – and the price journalists pay for doing this work. Here are some of my favorites from last year, in no particular order:

Small Town News: KPVM Pahrump

These six-part HBO docuseries about a TV news station in a small market, based about an hour from Las Vegas, it’s kind of like Office meets … well, a TV newsroom. A day where the days are bounded by regular news broadcasts, live news segments, and recording of customer announcements so that ad dollars keep pouring in.

People are the heart and soul of this story about a certain type of journalism – local TV news that is too easily overlooked when everything is just a click away on a smartphone. There is the gregarious Vern Van Winkle, the owner of the station, with his more balanced wife Ronda. “I always wanted people to have a visual concept of what was going on in their community,” Vern told me. “So they could see and relate to it firsthand. Instead of a printed version, of what someone noted pass.”

The heart of the station is Deanna, a sardonic jack-of-all-trades who fulfills a triple function as presenter, news director and on-site reporter. Eunette, an anchor with a megawatt smile, radiates positivity. And then there’s another husband and wife team – Missey and John, from transplants from Alaska. Missey helps behind the anchor desk. And John steps in to be the meteorologist, because … well, he can read a teleprompter, so why not? From start to finish, this series is as much a joy as it is a love letter to journalism.

Make this season of the show all the more interesting: it coincided with the 2020 presidential election, as well as the outbreak of the coronavirus pandemic.

Vendetta

I don’t understand how Italian TV journalist Pino Maniaci is still alive. Come to think of it, the fact seems to confuse him as well. “Every time I start my car I close my eyes,” Maniaci says in the Netflix series trailer Vendetta: truth, lies and the Mafia.

At first glance, Maniaci – who runs a TV station in Sicily called Telejato – looks like what you might get if the Pixar hosts produced a sketch of a journalist. He’s not physically imposing, but everything else is, from the almost comical mustache to the brash personality he brings to his anti-Mafia cover. The series ends up merging around how he bonds with an attorney. She accuses Maniaci of being in cahoots with the mafia. He accuses her with the same force: no, you are the corrupt one. You are the one on the spot.

In an email, filmmakers Davide Gambino and Ruggero DiMaggio explained to me that the genesis of this project dates back 15 years – when Ruggero was watching one of Maniaci’s TV shows in which he called mafia bosses of “pieces of (expletive)” on the air. Needless to say, “it was a unique and dangerous way to deal with them.” They continued in their note to me:

“For us Sicilians and Italians, Pino is one of the most interesting characters of all time. He has in him truth and lies, lights and shadows. More than saints or heroes, we are interested in three-dimensional characters who stimulate a captivating (story). “

Succession (Season 3)

Ah, Twitter media favorite HBO series. That of a media conglomerate similar to News Corp., led by a surly, virulent, Murdoch-like founder and CEO. And which, with the arrival of the long-awaited third season in mid-October, has once again given us a delightfully ugly glimpse into how the quirky whims and predilections of a rich and dirty family can determine fate. of a large media company. Yes, it is fiction, but this is where it is probably worth inserting something about art imitating life.

Sometimes it’s industry trends that shake up otherwise valiant journalistic ventures. Other times? These are the rapacious businessmen more at home in boardrooms than newsrooms – and who, like Kendall Roy, say things like, “On a stupid level, I wish my Twitter was off the hook ”- who bear some responsibility for the ills of this industry. .

Storm Lake

One thing worth repeating Storm Lake is that it is broadcast until mid-December at pbs.org. After that, the movie will be available through VOD platforms like Amazon and iTunes.

Journalists from all walks of life rave about this documentary reminiscent of the 2011 one Front page: in the New York Times. And where the late NYT media columnist David Carr was the most memorable figure in that previous document, Cullen is the Carr-like figure at the center of this new one. Local journalism is often talked about in dark, apocalyptic tones – so much so that it’s easy to forget that there are still newspapers like this one, made up of people without a TV contract and big, sophisticated newsrooms. . Who always make calls, knock on doors, cover meetings, and tell the story of a place – one signature at a time.

Jill Lawrence, USA Today columnist took to twitter with his verdict on the film: “You’ll laugh, you’ll cry, you’ll remember the 2020 Iowa caucus debacle and the stealthy spread of COVID in rural meat factories before it exploded in sight.” . And you will pray for local journalism.

The French dispatch

Director Wes Anderson’s latest film is an early-loving valentine to journalism, much like something like HBO’s Small town news is – while also offering, of course, a completely different finished product to viewing.

I’m adding this one to the list because, while, yes, it’s fiction, there’s also something timeless, substantial, and incredibly meaningful to be found here. The gist of the story is that Bill Murray is / was the editor of an American magazine in the most picturesque, Instagram-designed French town you can see. His team is meeting to prepare a final issue of the magazine, which is supposed to cease publication upon his death. Indeed, Murray’s avuncular editor states this fact in his will.

The magazine’s adorably eccentric journalists are preparing a few feature articles, as well as a travel column and an obituary for the latest issue. It’s so whimsical, weird, and fascinating to watch the stories of these writers unfold – the real thing is much more prosaic and unromantic – and it’s easy to leave a movie like this and feel like we don’t. were not looking for enough beauty for its own good. in journalism. The French dispatch, and more or less all of the movies and shows listed here, might even make you appreciate, if you haven’t already, the men and women capturing narrative Polaroids from their little corners of the world.

There are worse ways to make a living. After all, it’s as if the character of Jeffrey Wright – a food writer named Roebuck Wright – is gloating towards the end of The French dispatch:

“Maybe with luck we will find what escaped us in the places we once called our home.”



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No one trusts journalism anymore, and that’s a problem https://prospectingjournal.com/no-one-trusts-journalism-anymore-and-thats-a-problem/ Thu, 18 Nov 2021 21:26:50 +0000 https://prospectingjournal.com/no-one-trusts-journalism-anymore-and-thats-a-problem/ There are clichés about journalism that many journalists use to justify their work. Journalism is supposed to tell the truth to power. This is the first draft in history. He comforts the afflicted and afflicts the comfortable. News is something someone wants to suppress – everything else is publicity. Here’s the scoop: Almost everyone who […]]]>

There are clichés about journalism that many journalists use to justify their work. Journalism is supposed to tell the truth to power. This is the first draft in history. He comforts the afflicted and afflicts the comfortable. News is something someone wants to suppress – everything else is publicity.

Here’s the scoop: Almost everyone who reads journalism doesn’t believe it anymore.

It all comes down to who do you trust.

Trust is the motto that sustains most journalistic efforts. Trust between journalists and their sources. Trust between journalists and their editors. Trust between readers and the medium of their choice. Trust that the facts have been verified and presented in context. Trust that journalists have no hidden intentions but act in the public interest. Be confident that all sides will be covered fairly.

If trust is lost, the public turns away or turns elsewhere, and it is happening to an alarming degree all over the world, including in this country. The latest Ipsos poll on public confidence in the professions shows that only 26 percent of Canadians trust journalists.

Today, a major public opinion survey in the United States measured how little support journalism’s core values ​​have among the people who still care. It’s not a pretty picture. Maybe that’s why you haven’t seen a story about it in your daily life.

The study was carried out as part of the Media Insight Project, a collaboration of the American Press Institute and the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. He found that only 11% of Americans fully support the five values ​​of journalism tested.

These values ​​are the same that I have tried to follow in my 55 year career in journalism. These are values ​​still taught in journalism schools.

  1. Monitoring. Be a watchdog. Hold people in power accountable. Make them keep their promises. Make sure that politicians and business people act in the public interest, not for personal gain.
  2. Transparency. Lift the veil on secrecy. Make sure that the affairs of the public are conducted in public and not behind closed doors. Society works best if the public knows what is going on that affects our lives.
  3. Factualism. Check the information. The more facts people have, the closer they get to the truth. Keep things in context.
  4. Give voice to the less powerful. Amplify the voices of people who are affected by events or who are not often heard. Cover inequalities. Pay attention to who and what is left out.
  5. Social criticism. Highlight the problems of a community in order to solve them. Don’t just focus on what works or what people are saying and doing.

Only one of these values ​​had the support of a majority of Americans: factualism, the idea that more facts bring us closer to the truth. Sixty-seven percent of adults were in favor of it.

One would think the findings would prompt a widespread reassessment of journalism methods in newsrooms and journalism schools, especially the basics of what types of important stories to cover and how they are presented. But that did not happen in the six months after the study was published. The Media Insight Project report concludes, rather alarmingly: “When journalists say they’re only doing their job, the problem is a lot of people have doubts about what the job should be. (sic) ”

This loss of confidence has been identified by many media critics over the years, and some of the reasons for it were highlighted in a critical book I wrote about Canadian newspapers in 1998, as they were beginning to see a sharp decline in readership and advertising. Yesterday’s news (Fernwood) blamed the reporters squarely who I thought were out of touch with the needs of society and in some cases contributing to society’s problems by focusing so much on what is wrong. In fact, the US Trust Study found that only 29% of Americans support this type of journalism today. The study’s authors suggested that journalists should experiment with different story frameworks by focusing on solutions rather than problems and broadening their moral appeal.

I do not know of any Canadian news organization that does this or, for that matter, that is even aware of this American research. It’s as if the journalists and journalism leaders here have a death wish.

Fortunately, there is more going on in the United States and Europe.

No one is arguing that the core values ​​of journalism should be abandoned. It’s just that news agencies need to be more transparent with readers and viewers, and explain and show what these standards really mean.

Readers don’t believe journalists when they say they are detached and objective and act in the public interest. Come to think of it, few people can claim to be, especially those who work for institutions like newspapers and television stations which are either heavily regulated by the government or receive substantial subsidies – in the case of newspapers, grants that journalism executives have actively lobbied the federal government because their paying customers have evaporated.

Jay Rosen, a prominent American consultant and news critic, suggests journalists take a different approach, one he calls “showing your story.”

Instead of pretending that you are neutral, “give out what you think. Not everything you think about, but the part that readers, viewers, and listeners should know when deciding whether to trust your narrative of things.

Rosen is the author of What Are journalists for and professor of journalism at New York State University. He says:

“Instead of ‘We have no other goal than to bring you the news as accurately and accurately as possible’… you disclose your intention: to stimulate reform using the moral force of investigative journalism.

“Yes, it’s about having a program, but it’s a program that is true to the principles of good journalism. “

In some cases, “showing your story” can mean that reporters drop the third-person voice in their stories and tell them personally. Here’s how I covered this story and why, and here’s how I came to the conclusions I made. This can mean linking the reader to documents you have discovered and relied on, and text-based interviews with key sources. It can mean suggesting solutions and continuing a story until results are achieved.

Example: In the mid-90s, I approached the Toronto Star with the idea of ​​engaging my journalism students with journalists for a major investigative project. I was interested in unleashing the potential of the Internet to tell stories more fully. What would journalism look like if it were first adapted to the Internet and only later adapted to print media, instead of the other way around, as was the way things were done back then? The project was good: a deep dive into the covert way doctors are sanctioned for wrongdoing in Ontario. The chief reporter was the astonishing Rob Cribb, then the Starsenior investigative journalist at the University of Toronto, who then founded the Office of Innovative Investigative Journalism at the University of Toronto’s Dalla Lana School of Public Health. I got money from my dean at Ryerson to pay a handpicked team of students to do the search dog work, scour the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario records, search the records of the doctors who had been charged and to follow what happened to them. .

But Cribb editors at Star fainted. The story was designed exclusively for printing on a Saturday and Sunday, summing up months of research in one piece, documenting egregious cases of doctors literally getting away with murder or serious misdemeanors and getting away with it. with the equivalent of a slap on the wrist. Either that or they simply moved to another province undetected. I estimated that the project uncovered over a dozen cases of public interest and begged an editor to keep telling them until action was taken. But I got fired as an offline critic and administrator of a journalism school. The Star moved on to other stories.

Imagine the impact the story would have had if all the data gathered by Cribb and my students had been available online – a list of doctors so people could check if their doctor had been disciplined and why; an explanation of the extensive research that has been carried out on the history and the obstacles encountered which have prevented the public from accessing important information; a list of “must haves” to repair the system; transcribe interviews with key sources so that readers can form their own opinions.

The good news is that journalists in Europe have actively started to explore what lack of trust has cost journalism and what it could do differently. One example is the innovative Constructive Institute, launched in 2017 in Aarhus, Denmark, by Ulrik Haagerup, a former senior executive at Danish newspapers and TV stations. Its goal is to transform journalism. He thinks journalism has taken a bad turn towards negativity and sensationalism. He believes journalism is part of the problem of lack of confidence in democratic institutions. He thinks journalism should learn to focus on solutions. He thinks there is more to journalism than about who, what, when, where, why and how of things – he should ask “what’s next? “

The institute is well funded, it has reached out to a large network of journalism leaders, it has conducted experiences of constructive journalism in newsrooms, and it has hosted interns to experiment with new and more promising forms of journalism. So far at least, no Canadian media or journalist has contacted.

Haagerup believes journalism has produced a world in which people believe crime is increasing when in reality it is decreasing, where fear of terrorism is increasing but the real risk is low, where people have lost faith in institutions and are electing therefore leaders with simple answers and those who stir up fear.

Does this sound familiar to you?

Said Haagerup:

“We don’t believe in churches, we don’t believe in banks, insurance companies, politicians and all for many good reasons. But if people don’t believe in journalism, then who should they be leaning on? We need to restore journalism as an authority in democracy.

Good luck to him, I said. And maybe one day soon one of the leaders in Canadian journalism will pay attention.


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Journalism in Central America helped communities weather the pandemic | Covid-19 https://prospectingjournal.com/journalism-in-central-america-helped-communities-weather-the-pandemic-covid-19/ Tue, 16 Nov 2021 13:18:33 +0000 https://prospectingjournal.com/journalism-in-central-america-helped-communities-weather-the-pandemic-covid-19/ (The Conversation is an independent, nonprofit source of information, analysis, and commentary from academic experts.) William Thomas Mari, Louisiana State University (THE CONVERSATION) News of the pandemic’s devastating effect on journalism has been carried by headlines across the country recounting newsroom closings, layoffs and time off. Journalism was struggling in 2020. In fact, it had […]]]>

(The Conversation is an independent, nonprofit source of information, analysis, and commentary from academic experts.)

William Thomas Mari, Louisiana State University

(THE CONVERSATION) News of the pandemic’s devastating effect on journalism has been carried by headlines across the country recounting newsroom closings, layoffs and time off.

Journalism was struggling in 2020. In fact, it had been struggling for some time.

But how have so many local news agencies – especially newspapers – managed to survive the pandemic? Weekly newspapers have increased their daily coverage of online news, business models have exploded, and the existing justifications for which journalism issues have become more than theoretical for rural journalists.

Their determination to survive and serve as a lifeline for the public health of their communities fueled an oral history project that my colleague Teri Finneman and I led, interviewing 28 journalists in seven central states of the country. We learned how local and family newspapers survived COVID-19.

“There were times when we had to contact mayors and different towns and communities across the state… to make sure that… knew that [journalists] were considered essential workers, ”said Ashley Wimberley, executive director of the Arkansas Press Association. This label exempted journalists from stay-at-home orders and designated them as essential to their communities.

There were no easy answers. Not in Louisiana, where I teach journalism at Louisiana State University. Not just anywhere.

Tell a story

Oral history captures the first impressions of history for those living today, thinking back to what just happened. It helps people understand the present and how to get out of a crisis. But it also records events for academics and citizens in the future.

“Always remember that when you publish these stories in your journal, you are printing the history of your community,” Amy Johnson, editor of the Springview Herald in Nebraska told us.

Benny Polacca of Osage News in Oklahoma told us something similar: to report or research the time of COVID-19. “

Often it is coastal journalism that catches the attention of researchers. The New York Times, the Washington Post, the Los Angeles Times – these big news agencies are the subject of constant reporting.

By talking to reporters from North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Oklahoma, Arkansas and Louisiana, our project pushed back this tendency to ignore the nation’s background and its surroundings. important journalism. As a new kind of essential worker, journalists found themselves tasked with explaining the complicated guidelines from state and local authorities on COVID-19, how schools would operate and where to go for help.

“I hope that through this, our role as a journalist, they [the public] realize how important it is that the information we put out, you know, how it affects them every day, ”Johnson said.

Kansas Press Association Executive Director Emily Bradbury had a message for those journalists who worked for news outlets increasingly threatened with closure: “I want them to know that in the midst of an emergency, in the midst of an emergency, in the midst of what can seem like a dire situation, when they look at their finances, that what they do is important. And what they do is important, and that no one else can do what they do, and they look after their communities like no one else.

Loans, ancillary activities and transactions

Journalists and editors have found new ways to pay the bills. This meant accepting government grants in the form of paycheck protection program loans. This meant, for some, going door-to-door and asking readers to subscribe, or continue to subscribe. This involved consolidating newspapers, publishing more editions online, or cutting wages.

“People just don’t understand. It costs a lot of money and time to do it, and I just wish we – there was more value or people appreciate it or understand the value and cost of really providing this service, ”said Bonita Gooch. , the publisher of The Community Voice. , a black newspaper based in Wichita, Kansas.

Some publishers have gone to great lengths to generate income, by creating advertising copy for local businesses or by doing marketing.

At the Kingfisher Times & Free Press in Oklahoma, for example, Christine Reid, the newspaper’s editor, created ads for a local vocational and technical school. “I also tried using this as a way to… generate more ads for the newspaper,” Reid said.

Some newspapers have advertising deals with local businesses, with consumers shopping more locally.

Local publishers have done everything to stay afloat. As some of our early findings have shown, this showed both an opportunity and a reluctance to change.

“We’re going to have to rely less on ad revenue and more on subscription revenue, so we have to make sure we’re delivering a unique product that they want to pay for,” said Letti Lister, president and publisher. from the Black Hills Pioneer in Spearfish, South Dakota.

We have seen signs of hope, as journalists garnered financial and moral support from their readers in a turbulent election. “On the contrary, it has rallied the troops, if you will, in our community because they trust us, they know that we will report the news in a timely manner and keep the public informed,” said Amy Wobbema, editor. . of the New Rockford transcript in North Dakota. Arguably, most of the blankets were calm and even.

But there were still hesitations about what newspapers should do to adapt. Some journalists are uncomfortable with the idea of ​​receiving government funding and would prefer to rely on community support.

As the executive director of the South Dakota Newspaper Association, Dave Bordewyk, put it, “Kind of like, ‘Look, contribute to our newspaper… that’s gone.

Ultimately, the pandemic showed that more research needs to be done on journalism in rural areas – we have only managed to speak to a fraction of the total number of small town journalists and editors. Other academics have already learned that local journalism helps reduce violent partisanship and strengthens institutions. To be clear, researchers have defined violent partisanship as the willingness to resort to physical altercations to resolve differences – good local journalism channels this energy towards peaceful and democratic ends. Other researchers have found that institutions such as courts and local governments gain increased legitimacy because of local news. Further scientific attention will likely reveal other benefits that the public is not yet aware of.

“This is what we hope for. What I hope will come out of this is that the readers can understand this, and can… have a renewed value on what it is. [local] publication did for their community during this pandemic, ”Bradbury told us.

[Understand key political developments, each week. Subscribe to The Conversation’s politics newsletter.]

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article here: https://theconversation.com/journalism-in-middle-america-got-communities-through-the-pandemic-165300.


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Scottish Catholic journalism experiences a revival with new magazine https://prospectingjournal.com/scottish-catholic-journalism-experiences-a-revival-with-new-magazine/ https://prospectingjournal.com/scottish-catholic-journalism-experiences-a-revival-with-new-magazine/#respond Thu, 11 Nov 2021 07:04:07 +0000 https://prospectingjournal.com/scottish-catholic-journalism-experiences-a-revival-with-new-magazine/ The Scottish Catholic launch heralds a renaissance of Catholic journalistic integrity and ethics in Scotland, says Jason Osborne The pandemic has wreaked havoc in all aspects of the Church and Church-related life, with Catholic media no different. In Scotland, the combined hardships of the pandemic and the resulting restrictions have resulted in the venerable Scottish […]]]>
The Scottish Catholic launch heralds a renaissance of Catholic journalistic integrity and ethics in Scotland, says Jason Osborne

The pandemic has wreaked havoc in all aspects of the Church and Church-related life, with Catholic media no different.

In Scotland, the combined hardships of the pandemic and the resulting restrictions have resulted in the venerable Scottish Catholic Observer, 135, being shut down. Founded in 1885, it was Scotland’s only national Catholic newspaper, covering events and stories internationally, nationally and locally. Suffice to say that his loss was a painful blow for the Catholic community in the country.

Integrity

However, October saw the rebirth, if not the Scottish Catholic Observer, a publication seeking to move forward in the same spirit of Catholic journalistic integrity. The Scottish Catholic was started in the skillful hands of former Scottish Catholic Observer editor-in-chief Ian Dunn and Mary and Dan McGinty of The Irish Voice, a mother-and-son team with both journalistic background and Catholic publishing.

Speaking to The Irish Catholic, Mr Dunn spoke of the “opportunity” they saw in the void left by the closure of the Scottish Catholic Observer.

“Myself and a few others, Mary McGinty and Dan McGinty, they are a mother-son team who have both been involved in the [Scottish Catholic] Observation days, and they also run a monthly newspaper / magazine for the Irish in Scotland called The Irish Voice, so they have the experience of launching something as it’s been around 10 years now, ”said Mr. Dunn to this journal.

“Obviously it’s a smaller thing, but they knew the inner workings of this sort of thing. So the three of us got together and said, “Well, maybe this is an opportunity”. At that point, we’re in the middle of a second lockdown, we don’t know what’s going on, but we were like, ‘Okay, let’s see if he’s an amateur’.

“So we started looking and seeing what people were looking for, we talked to the bishops, we talked to the priests, we talked to the Lord and his wife in a way. They really felt like there was a hunger, ”he says.

It takes a trustworthy, reliable voice that people will trust to tell them the truth.

The “hunger” among Catholics in Scotland is “simply” for journalistic integrity and Catholic ethics, says M. having “very American arguments”.

“There were good things in various dioceses and good people doing things, but without that local source of trust, a lot of it is American, a lot of it is from elsewhere, so we started to see people having American arguments, you know?

“A lot of this kind of ‘culture war’ stuff comes in waves that sound pretty poisonous, and that was something that really – we saw there was a real need for it. It takes a dignified voice. trusted, reliable, that people will trust to tell them the truth. But also just not to be savage. Don’t go out saying all kinds of crazy things, but have that journalistic integrity. Just that and Catholic ethics There is a need for this, ”said Dunn.

Consumer papers

In the heyday of the Scottish Catholic Observer, Dunn said “mainstream newspapers” regularly pick up their stories on weekends, and that is the kind of reporting he looks forward to returning to. Getting to the heart of the matter and telling people what no one else will do is “the heart of what you want to do” as a journalist, he says.

“I would always be a big believer that society needs journalists, we need journalists who can hold people to account. Who can tell you what’s really going on, who can weed out all the nonsense on Facebook and social media and tell it straight to you. Now as much as ever. Societies need it.

“Catholicism and journalism often seem to disagree, but fundamentally they have one thing in common, namely: journalism is, if it’s done right, finding out the truth, trying to get some kind of truth. , and I would be totally of the opinion that if you dig deep enough and look hard enough, you come up with some pretty basic truths and, ultimately, Catholic, ”he said.

There is going to be this balance… we are going to do this little news, it will be there, for sure, but at the same time, faith comes from the heart ”

By launching this magazine because they think it is ‘necessary’ in the Scottish landscape, Mr Dunn and his team are under no illusions that it will be easy, predicting a ‘roller coaster ride’ and a few “bumps” in the magazine’s first few months, but they are bolstered by a sense of need and knowing that they are “on the way to a winner”.

“We think we’ve got a good product, a good magazine, there’s going to be a lot of exciting things in there… it’s going to be a lot of grafting, but we’re excited to take on the challenge,” Mr. Dunn said.

Speaking a lot about the digging and research that is part of a journalist’s career, Mr. Dunn doesn’t overlook the softer side of the job – “unveiling” and “shining a light” on things and people that “are good. and deserve to be celebrated ”.

Faith

“There’s going to be that balance… we’re going to do this little news, it’s going to be there for sure, but at the same time, faith comes from the heart. A key aspect for us is to put Scottish Catholics at the heart of The Scottish Catholic.

“I mean, how many people in our parishes, in Ireland as well as in Scotland, are absolute heroes, going about their business quietly, just living righteous lives, you know? Telling some of these stories is really important to us.


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Falmouth Packet staff dubbed “clowns” and ordered to resign by attackers https://prospectingjournal.com/falmouth-packet-staff-dubbed-clowns-and-ordered-to-resign-by-attackers/ https://prospectingjournal.com/falmouth-packet-staff-dubbed-clowns-and-ordered-to-resign-by-attackers/#respond Tue, 09 Nov 2021 09:16:32 +0000 https://prospectingjournal.com/falmouth-packet-staff-dubbed-clowns-and-ordered-to-resign-by-attackers/ A weekly newspaper fought back after its reporters were dubbed “clowns”, asked to resign and said they “should be ashamed” of online attackers. The Falmouth Packet has hit back at readers who see journalists as a “fair game” for abuse after a recent wave of attacks on its journalists. The attackers were criticized in the […]]]>

A weekly newspaper fought back after its reporters were dubbed “clowns”, asked to resign and said they “should be ashamed” of online attackers.

The Falmouth Packet has hit back at readers who see journalists as a “fair game” for abuse after a recent wave of attacks on its journalists.

The attackers were criticized in the Packet’s ‘Skipper’ column in which he also referred to the departure of chief reporter Lee Trewhela, pictured, from rival headline Cornwall Live.

HTFP reported last month how Lee, who previously worked on The Packet, cited social media abuse as a factor in his decision to quit the regional newspaper industry after 30 years of service.

The Skipper’s column said: “While his loss to the industry is sad, which is even sadder is one of the reasons he gave for his decision – the systematic online abuse of journalists, almost daily. “

He added: “Unfortunately, this is something every journalist can appreciate and understand.

“In the last week alone, Packet reporters have been told they are ‘a clown’, that they should quit and ‘be ashamed’ – anyway, just to report issues that other people must ask us for help, and for quoting this. anybody.

“Imagine if someone walked into your house – and remember this is where all reporters work now, for at least part of the week – would point their finger in your face and start yelling, ‘You should. to be ashamed ! “

“You would probably think of calling the police. But because it’s on a computer screen, it’s deemed acceptable and journalists are considered a “fair game”, just like MPs (who, let’s remember, are also just human beings with feelings and families ultimately).

“#Bekind is so quoted these days that it almost loses its meaning, but for those who find the above behavior acceptable, let me ask a question: would you be happy if someone did that, and why else are you doing it to someone else? “


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From the Editor: Journalism, like freedom, is not free | Chroniclers https://prospectingjournal.com/from-the-editor-journalism-like-freedom-is-not-free-chroniclers/ https://prospectingjournal.com/from-the-editor-journalism-like-freedom-is-not-free-chroniclers/#respond Sat, 06 Nov 2021 23:10:10 +0000 https://prospectingjournal.com/from-the-editor-journalism-like-freedom-is-not-free-chroniclers/ It’s not often that I’m called by my name in a letter to the editor. It is even rarer when I write such a letter as they tend to be akin to personal attacks and rants rather than productive speech. But this week, reader Marc Levin specifically addresses a number of questions and concerns to […]]]>

It’s not often that I’m called by my name in a letter to the editor. It is even rarer when I write such a letter as they tend to be akin to personal attacks and rants rather than productive speech.

But this week, reader Marc Levin specifically addresses a number of questions and concerns to me, and I feel they merit discussion.

Marc raises two questions that have generated quite a bit of discussion in journalism circles lately. One is the fascinating and depressing article in the latest issue of The Atlantic magazine about how a somewhat murky hedge fund called Alden Global Capital grabs distressed newspapers and smashes everything they have left of their lives to make money. money quickly.

The other is the news that the Wall Street Journal ran a lengthy letter from Donald Trump in which he details his now-familiar stew of lies, distortions and fulminations about the 2020 election. The Journal published the letter without warning, rebuttal or comment, despite their own reporters and editors publicly reporting that it was all a bunch of pernicious nonsense.

People also read …

I will come to the third thing that Marc brings up in a moment, because it is arguably the most important point of all, but he asks me directly what is my opinion and my policy on these two points.

When it comes to newspaper ownership, there is simply no doubt that all news agencies have been savagely battered by the changes in the advertising market and the advent of the Internet, as I have discussed several times in this chronicle. Here at the Register we have a fraction of the staff that we had as recently as when we started as editor in 2014.

Letters: A reader asks important questions of editor Sean Scully.

I have no idea what’s in store for the Registry, or what our parent company executives are likely to do, but I can confidently say I’m not afraid of the kind of dire fate that awaits once-powerful giants. like the Baltimore Sun and Chicago Tribune, or the local Vallejo Times-Herald, which have all fallen into Alden’s clutches.

Lee Enterprises, which owns the registry, was founded as a media company in 1890 and remains a media-focused company today. Although we have all had to rush to deal with the new economic reality, the company shows a deep interest in maintaining local coverage. They’ve taken steps to try and rebuild some of the capabilities we lost when the advertising markets collapsed, providing nationwide coverage, centralized features and sports, developing a layout, graphic design and centralized web operations; and regionalizing costly business and HR operations.

More importantly, the company has an ambitious plan to build a sustainable base of subscriptions to fund the newspaper. It’s a long and agonizing process, but the company seems determined to follow it, which speaks to a kind of forward-looking thinking that Alden shows no interest in.

As for the Wall Street Journal, I can only guess what they were thinking. On the one hand, a first-hand glimpse of the former and possibly the future President of the United States is a rare and important thing. But on the other hand, what he was saying was a bunch of obvious and potentially dangerous nonsense.

I don’t know how I would react if I was presented with such a letter. It is possible that I categorically refuse it, as I have done with similar letters from people who do not call themselves Trump. It is possible that I published it, given its prominence in the national discourse, but I would have done so at a minimum with a strong disclaimer and specific fixes. There is no way, however, that I would have written such a letter without a comment or response.

Now to Mark’s third point.

He asks me directly “how can we help you survive to provide this most essential service, because how can the community make informed decisions if they are not informed?” “

The answer is simple. Subscribe. Tell your friends and family to subscribe. Subscribe to the Registry and any other newspaper or magazine from which you find useful information and enjoyment.

Advertising funded almost everything that newspapers and other media do. Now it’s up to you to vote with your feet, or more specifically, your membership dollars.

The idea is not new either. If you’re a regular listener or viewer of public radio and television, you know that for five decades they’ve spent time every few months advocating for you to donate money to keep their operations afloat. . They call it “membership,” but the effect is exactly the same as a subscription.

We know that the traditional paper subscription is getting more and more expensive and that not everyone can afford it. That’s why we offer a variety of online subscriptions, ranging from a few dollars a month to luxury packages that include lots of additional features and benefits.

I’m sure we can find a subscription deal that meets your needs and budget. Please visit napavalleyregister.com/members/join/ to see our standard rates and any specials we may have.

Every dollar and every subscriber counts. The future of the Registry and so many other media is in your hands.

A revolutionary new blood test can detect more than 50 different types of cancer at an early stage. The test was developed by the California healthcare company GRAIL in partnership with the Mayo Clinic. The test is able to detect different types of cancer from two tubes of blood taken from the patient. “We can find and sequence these tiny pieces of tumor-derived DNA in the blood and, based on the patterns we see, we can reveal if there is a cancer signal present”, Dr Julia Feygin, GRAIL Senior Medical Science Liason. Researchers can then predict with great precision where the cancer signal is coming from in the body. The cancer screening test currently recommended in the United States covers only five types of cancer. Researchers say the test has the potential to transform cancer care by reducing cancer deaths and costs.



You can reach Sean Scully at 256-2246 or sscully@napanews.com.


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